Noon Launch Info

There are THREE NOON Book Launches

On 21st March 2019:
5-6pm CORK Waterstones 69 Patrick Street, Cork free Facebook event
Organised by Anne Elizabeth Bevan who will be reading with friends:

Mother Hand, Karen Ankers
Toast Crumbs, Karen Boissonneault-Gauthier
Veranda, Clare Shaw
Farewell My Father, Anne Elizabeth Bevan
Moon Jellyfish, Ness Owen
Fire at Midday, Susan Cartwright-Smith

AND
7-9pm GREENWICH Stephen Lawrence Gallery 10 Stockwell Street London SE10 9BD free facebook event
Organised by us.

Authors reading:

Precarious, Michelle Penn
Still No Name, Marika Josef
#Noon, Su Yin Yap
Veranda, Clare Shaw
After Hours, Stuart McKenzie
and possibly more.
There will be cake

and on 29 March 2019

17:30-18:30 Aberdeen Blackwell’s Aberdeen 99 High Street, AB24 3EN free: Facebook event
Organised by Intuitive Music Aberdeen who are also providing music

Moon Jellyfish by Ness Owen read by Marka Rifat
On the First Calculation of the Circumference of the Earth
by Alison Gerhard read by Haworth Hodgkinson
Pocket Watch written and read by Catriona Yule
High Noon written and read by Marka Rifat
Noon Talk by Graham Burchell read by Haworth Hodgkinson
Sun Beats over New Orleans by Natalie Gasper read by Catriona Yule
Arthur Streeton Advises his Students by Mandy Macdonald read by Marka Rifat
Mother Hand by Karen Ankers read by Catriona Yule
Unleashed by Paul Foy read by Marka Rifat
An Autumn Noon by Ian Grosz read by Haworth Hodgkinson
I am not Beautiful at Noon by Elinor Brooks read by Catriona Yule

It would be really great if there was standing room only (again) so if you’d like to come, make yourself known on the Facebook events or contact us

 

call out: Story Cities

A note from our friends at University of Greenwich

 Story Cities – a call for flash fictions
‘The city is redundant: it repeats itself so that something will stick in the mind . . .
Memory is redundant: it repeats signs so that the city can begin to exist’
– Marco Polo to Kublai Khan in Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities

In Calvino’s masterful work, Marco Polo explores images of distant cities where time, space, objects and individuals are presented in visions. Each description is filled with varying degrees of enchantment, absurdity, impossibility and allure.
The weaving of these accounts questions what is real and unreal; recollections of disparate lands invoke the realisation that perhaps all reveal a single place so that:
‘the more one was lost in unfamiliar quarters of distant cities, the more one understood the other cities he had crossed to arrive there’ (Calvino).
The city is a place where populations meet and strangers pass one another. Where stories are created, told, remembered and discarded. One city connects us to the memory or spirit of another; repeating rituals and behaviours which provide spectacle for the tourist
and uniformity for the global citizen. As we move within the city we operate within the systems that transport us, the signs that guide us, the encounters that confront us and the thoughts which carry us.

Brief – call for submissions
This brief invites submissions for new short works of fiction in any genre that address the theme of the city. It asks you to explore the journeys we take; the situations we encounter and interact with; the dialogues and connections we make – in order to highlight universally shared experiences and understandings of the city and / or imagine them
differently.

Working under one (per story) of the following themes:
the Market, Square, Café, Hotel, Park, Station and Port, Main Street, Side Street, Crossroads, On the train, On the bus / tram – writers are asked to create narratives that speak of / to / through the city.

Story Cities is a collaborative research project initiated by lecturers at the University of Greenwich, London
Rosamund Davies, Senior Lecturer in Media and Creative Writing and
Kam Rehal, Senior Lecturer in Graphic and Digital Design. It explores ways in which
stories might respond to, reference, reflect and reimagine the city. Selected works will be published in a physical book that readers can carry into cities – to experience the city through stories. Acting as guides, companions and tools for reflection, we hope that the stories can encourage the reader to experience the city differently.

You are invited to participate in this project by submitting new short works of fiction in any genre that address the theme of the city.

Guidance
There are a set of guidelines that we ask contributors to work with:
1. All contributors must be aged 18 and over
2. Each story can be between 1–500 words in length (no longer), excluding title
3. Up to 3 stories may be submitted by each contributor
4. Names of specific places must not be used – nor should characters be given names. Your story should be written so that it works in any city
5. All submissions must be works of fiction and the author’s own work, unpublished and in English. If this work is under consideration elsewhere you must inform us immediately if it is accepted
6. All work must be submitted with author’s name and a contact email – please do not supply any additional contact details at this stage
7. All work must be submitted by the named author and he/she must hold rights to the material
8. All contributors must sign and complete the consent form and submit this with
their work(s)*
9. There will be no monetary reward for inclusion in the publication but a copy of the book will be presented to each contributor. Copyright will be retained by the author, with licence for exclusive publication for a to-be-agreed period not exceeding one year.
Once we have received and considered all submissions we will edit an initial selection of stories for publication.

If you have any questions please contact:
Kam Rehal and Rosamund Davies at the University of Greenwich on: StoryCities@gre.ac.uk
+44(0)20 8331 9013

SUBMIT TO StoryCities@gre.ac.uk
Deadline for submissions: 16/09/2018

*email the submissions address to get the form

 

Call out for Deaf writers

This call out is specifically for WRITING FROM DEAF AUTHORS.see our other call out if you aren’t deaf.
This year’s Solstice Shorts Festival (21st December) once again falls on a weekday, so we are taking that SHORT thing and making it really curt and to the point. and our Subject is SHORTEST DAY.

For absolute clarity, as we have had several submissions for the first stage of this call out which are off theme, your work should in some way address SHORTEST DAY, be that midwinter specifically or some other way in which a day is shortened. Interpret how you will, but if we can’t recognise a link to Shortest Day, your  work won’t get chosen.

FLASH fiction and poetry up to an absolute MAXimum of 1000 words, and we like shorter for preference, so make every word count.

Deadline 23:59 31st August 2016

Successful stories & poems will join Longest Night stories and poems in an anthology to be published in time for the festival, and of course be performed at the festival.

Entries in English or BRITISH Sign Language and your own unaided original and UNPUBLISHED work.
Writers can come from anywhere in the world, as we will have actors/signers perform your work.

submit

If you want to submit in BSL (and it does need to be BRITISH sign language, sorry, we aren’t able to interpret other sign languages) you can send us a video: AVI, MP4, WMA, MOV.

Shortest Day call out for flash fiction & poetry part 2

This call out is for SHORT/FLASH fiction and poetry of no more than 1000 words.
In English, unpublished.
Deadline 23:59, 31 August 2016

The theme is Shortest Day.

Please stick to it, but do not use this as your title! How you choose to interpret shortest day is entirely up to you.
This is the second part of an earlier call out, and this part is to RESPOND to music for which you will be sent a link – (the reason the link is not here is to respect the copyright of the musicians and composers, only people actively seeking to respond to the call out will have access to it.) Contact us to ask for the link
Successful pieces will be performed at the 3rd Solstice Shorts Festival on 21st December 2016 in Greenwich, London. Please tell us which piece of music inspired you, so that we can curate the music and story/poem alongside, or even together.
Successful stories and poems will also be published in an anthology, alongside pieces from last year’s Longest Night event. We pay royalties for publication. (Shared between all contributors, so it will be tiny, but still!)
We already have quite a lot of poetry, so would be particularly interested in stories, but quality is foremost.
When you are ready, submit here.

submit

Have fun.

Shortest Day Call Out for stories poems and songs/music

This Call Out is NOW CLOSED

This year’s Solstice Shorts Festival (21st December) once again falls on a weekday, so we are taking that SHORT thing and making it really curt and to the point. and our Subject is SHORTEST DAY.
FLASH fiction and poetry up to an absolute Maximum of 1000 words, and we like shorter for preference, so make every word count. We will only have a couple of hours so your story/poem needs to be short, sweet and absolutely sparkle.
We are going a bit experimental this year, so we are also looking for MUSIC, original and without words, or traditional with words that fits the theme; and what we are going to do is invite people to respond to each other – so writers to musicians and vice versa, so the call out will be in two parts. (Are you still with me?)
THIS first call out ends on Midsummer’s day 21st June. We will pick some work at that point, and then we will invite you to submit again, based on your inspirations from each other, with a deadline of 21st September. Don’t worry about the second bit yet, just letting you know you get a second go.
Final chosen stories and poems will in addition to being performed at the festival, join last year’s magnificent Longest Night stories and poems in an anthology to be published in time for the festival; Shortest Day, Longest Night
Story and Poem entries: in English and your own unaided original and UNPUBLISHED work.
Writers can come from anywhere in the world, as we will have actors perform your work.
Songs can be any language, but we would prefer the musicians among you to be able to perform at the Festival in London yourselves.
ADDITIONAL heads up! We welcome stories/ poems from Deaf writers. If you want to submit in BSL (and it does need to be BRITISH sign language, Sorry) you can send us a video. AVI, MP4, WMA, MOV.
We also welcome entries from blind writers. You can submit using audio files, MP3 or WAV.

This Call Out is NOW CLOSED

Bespoke flash short story greeting cards

We try to be imaginative with our crowd fund rewards. Here’s an idea: Cherry has been creating ridiculous cards for friends for years made from found images and single sentence or flash stories; and for a while sold them. You can have your (or a friend’s) name(s) inserted into the silliness that is a ‘daft dyke’ card. Lots to choose from, which will be printed individually for you for a paltry fiver.

IMG_8639

you can find more information here.

What are we crowd funding for? Solstice Shorts 2015, Longest Night, of course!

You can order your card(s) here.

Solstice Shorts Crowd Funding Reward: bespoke flash fiction

Unique Bespoke Festive Flash

£100 or more for print version 1 available from each participating author

£75 or more for electronic version 1 available from each participating author

A number of our authors have volunteered to write 100 word flash fiction especially for you (so far, Rob Walton, Mi Holliday Bernie Howley and Wendy Gill – others may follow). So you, or a friend/family member/ favourite cat/place will feature (depending on what details you provide. These will be UNIQUE pieces, they will never be published and it’s not just a case of changing the name. The story will be typeset and printed, sent to you as a festive card (please state your prefered festival, and which writer you would prefer – they are only doing one each) Includes cost of postage, or alternatively for the lower price, we can send you a pdf to print yourself.

All in support of Solstice Shorts Festival. Find this and more rewards on our crowd funding campaign

THE STORY SESSIONS: Call out for stories to be read and authors to read

We’re planning our next run of The Story Sessions and we’re looking for authors to join in.

You might headline with a published story of no more than 2000 words, or try out our testbed with something new and get audience feedback (again 2000 words max), or just turn up with 100 words on theme for our Flash from the Floor audience participation slot.

we prioritise actual short stories, but will consider an extract from something longer.

We are still looking for a couple more stories for our May 21st Sci Fi evening, if anyone (especially female authors) has something suitable please get in touch. Deadline MAY 1st.

Our July 23rd evening is for that strange creature the ‘Young Adult‘. By my reckoning that’s anyone from 12 to 17 & 11/12ths. We will be having a reading from Alex Smith‘s novel (published the following day) Devilskein & Dearlove, but we’d  like some more work aimed at this age group, AND we’d like to hear from writers IN that age group. So if you are between 12 and 18 and you have a short story you would like to share, and you are happy to come to the event and read it yourself, ask your parent or guardian to get in touch. Deadline June 1st

Looking further ahead, in September we are looking for stories that feature animals: big, small, wild or domestic, real or fantastical: if you’ve got an animal at the centre of your story then we want to hear from you. (not too twee, please; and not gory!) Deadline August 1st

Elton asleep copyright Cherry Potts

Elton asleep copyright Cherry Potts

 

Vote for National Short Story Week Flash Competition

We asked for stories of exactly 100 words, and here are the submissions.  We are posting them anonymously, in order of receipt. You can vote for as many stories as you like, but only vote once, please!

Voting closed on Sunday at 5pm the winner was announced as Story 5.

Story 1

How can you not know your season?

Last year you were so bitingly cold that I spent sixty two pounds on warm slippers.

This year you blame October. Oh yes, we know it started cold but it quickly warmed. The wasps buzzed and grew flabbily indolent and seriously argumentative.

Now we rely on you to freeze them, to seal them in their many layered homes.

I had no use for my slippers in the spring, nor in the summer. Now November, you decide. Are you autumn or are you winter? When can I brush the dust from the Harris Tweed?

Story 2

Cervelaf sprawled on his mossy woodland throne. An empty tankard dangled from one finger, his great antlered head lolled.

The doe-woman, Devnet, emerged from the forest edge, bow in hand. Graceful as ever, she crossed the clearing and bowed before Cervelaf. ‘The Marasmus has returned.’

Blood surged through Cervelaf’s heart. At last! He leapt to his feet, seized his hunting horn and gave three blasts.

Echoes of the horn faded among the trees. Cervelaf drove his fist into his palm and paced the clearing.  Finally, the seasons turned. Boar-warriors, fox-people and collared men gathered around.

It was time to hunt.

Story 3

“Penny for the Guy,” I called from the doorway of the laundrette.

10p would get us a Wham bar. 20p would get a Texan. Anything else would get cola bottles or gummy bears in triplicate.

“You going to burn it, then?” asked a man in a leather jacket, pointing with his cigarette at the bundle by my feet.

I nodded, feeling shy.

“Do it now and I’ll give you a tenner,” he said, pulling a half-full can of lighter fluid from his pocket.

I just hoped my little brother would stay still long enough for me to get the money.

Story 4

It was night in the countryside; there was no light, not from moon or house. Reaching out a hand I switched on the lamp. It gave a dull click but nothing happened.

A power cut.

Across the ceiling an unearthly light painted a geometric and random pattern. Its very nature made me afraid. Quietly, as if there were company in the room, I went to the window and peered out. On the hill opposite a light danced.

I huddled awaiting my fate, but nothing happened. All night I sat until the morning revealed the truth; a harvester on the hill.

Story 5

What is the late November doing? Spring was disturbed; the summer was hot; November terrifies.

The shining woods with their gold-brown light have tempted me out, against my better judgement. Perhaps this time it won’t happen.

And then it hoves into view: a ghastly half-rotten face with staring holes for eyes and a jagged, open mouth. It is laughing at me!

Charred twigs form a sinister circle at my feet; footprints in the mud remind me of a teasing, jeering mob.

The remains of a spiked wheel hang forlornly on a fence. It’s the 25th and my name is Catherine.

Story 6

Every month has its own flavour : February – chocolate, July  – raspberry, October – apple; November is treacle. Burnt sugar, molasses, toffee  it doesn’t matter how I come by it, so long as there’s that bitter dark sweetness – toffee apple, parkin, stir-up Sunday; the air is constantly full of that scent, sticky with the feel of winter: dead leaves, fireworks and fires. My earliest memory is of sticking my baby-teeth together with treacle toffee, wielding the little hammer that was meant to break the slab apart. I hit more than the toffee, and ever since, treacle has been the flavour of guilt.

Story 7

For the past three years, Anna had tried to imagine that November wasn’t going to happen. The kitchen wall calendar remained stuck on October until the 1st of December, when she would turn two pages at once. Guy Fawkes and St Andrews Day were passed over, and she pretended that the birthdays and anniversaries that she would have previously penned in didn’t exist. But every time she dated a document, or picked up a newspaper, or checked an email she couldn’t avoid the countdown to the only important date in November – the anniversary to her husband’s death on 30 November.

Story 8

That Friday was our first taste, although not the expected exotic Spaghetti Bolognese.  We’d giggled, anticipating our big sister’s bubbling pot, the whole sixty mile bumpy bus journey, but were met by Bobby unsmiling at the bus stop, “Quick, into the van.”

Margaret tensely smiled as we whirled to Foresterhill.  Bobby paced outside, “Your dinner? Here.” We raced into the dark but, no chipper, only an offlicence offering us the new flavour, roast chicken crisps, with liquorice Toffos for dessert. Sated, we returned to Bobby’s mixed delight and denial at “It’s ANOTHER girl”, much too young to be our dad.

Story 9

My father was a cross in a field, with a red flower in the centre, like his heart was pinned there.  It was cold and damp so I wrapped him in my jumper; but my mother told me off and I put it on again.  We left my father standing there, one cross among hundreds; a tree in a forest of stumps.

My father had fallen, they said: I wondered how far he’d fallen and how he had turned into this tiny wooden fork with a heart pinned to it.

My father was a cross in a field.

National Short Story Week Competition

It’s NatiNSSWlogoonal Short Story Week!

Story Sessions logo copyThat’s good news for us, as that’s what we publish (so far, anyway). To celebrate we are hosting an edition of The Story Sessions at The Ivy House this Wednesday. Lots more information here

.

And we thought we’d give you a chance to join in. At the Story Sessions we give the audience the chance to write 100 words on theme and read it out, so now you can do the same: 100 words (excluding title), not a word more, not a word less – strictly fiction! You have until 5pm on Friday, when we will post the entries and then we will have online voting until 5pm on Sunday when the winner will be announced. Prize is the warm glow of being appreciated, and maybe a badge.

Theme: November. Whatever that conjurers up for you.

THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED