Submission call for UK Deaf Short Story Writers and Poets for ‘Movement’ anthology

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BSL version of this page signed for us by Marcel Hirshman of WealdBSL

Arachne Press is planning an anthology of fiction and poetry by Deaf and hard-of-hearing writers, which will be produced as a printed book, an eBook and a series of videos. The eBook will contain links to the videos, which will also be on the Arachne Website, and probably YouTube.

Our editors are Lisa Kelly (co-editor of Magma 69, The Deaf Issue; co-Chair of Magma Poetry, first collection A Map Towards Fluency published by Carcanet) and Sophie Stone (RADA trained Actor, Writer: Paine’s Plough, The Bunker, BBC Radio 3 and Co-founder of DH Ensemble theatre Co)

We have chosen the theme of movement, to fit with our overarching theme for this year and next, of ‘maps and mapping.’

You can interpret this however you want,  and we’ve been thinking about movement as communication and connection, mobility, and stillness, being moved emotionally, movement within and after Lockdown, freedom of movement, and being part of a political movement – so we are open to all your ideas… Except! NO Erotica, horror, gratuitous violence, sexism, racism, or homophobia.

We actively encourage submissions from underrepresented voices, including ethnically diverse writers, LGBTQ writers, writers with experience of multiple socio-economic deprivation and women writers.

You can apply in written English, or by video in BSL, SSE or whatever UK based form of sign you wish; or in writing and sign. We will pay royalties.

We will be translating everything that arrives signed into English, and we will also be translating everything that arrives written, into BSL. We will discuss with you in detail so that we get these translations right.

If your work is chosen and you want to do the signed version yourself, it will depend on the state of lockdown, and on your own technical skills with a camera; we will do our best, but we don’t want to put anyone at risk. If you don’t want to sign your own work, or it isn’t possible due to lockdown etc,  we will use a signing Deaf actor/translator.

For the submission just use a phone to video yourself and send us a file no bigger than 400mb. If your file is larger, let us know and we will arrange an alternative method.

You can send us one story of up to 2000 words/15 minutes of signing, and up to 3 poems around 650 words/5 minutes each which total up to 2000 words/15 minutes of signing, or 1 poem and 1 story.

We would prefer that the work be unpublished, but if you have published something that is a perfect fit, we will consider it, provided you hold the copyright.

Deadline for submissions 14th April 2021

Publication planned for 16th September 2021

All submissions via https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit, where you can also find submission calls for Black Asian and Minority Ethnic writers, and  for Welsh Poets, should either of those apply to you.

And now for some GOOD News

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We could all do with some cheer in the bleak days of January, especially this year, so courtesy of Arts Council England, we are here to do just that.

We are the proud and happy recipients of a £45,000 grant from Arts Council England

This will pay for our next ten books, and (drum roll) audio books! Which means we can smack Covid on the nose by providing another way to enjoy our books without leaving home, and provide some work to actors who aren’t allowed into a theatre just now. I’m anticipating it will also be huge fun. Putting the plans together now with our audiobook partner Listening Books

Thanks to everyone who gave us their thoughts on whether this was the right way to go. It’s one of the fastest growing sectors in literature, but it’s tough to get right, and harder still to market, so the funding will also pay for …

A part-time marketing person, and a (separate) part-time admin person for a few months, so that I can concentrate on finding and supporting new writers and guest editors. We will be advertising these posts very soon. They will be remote working, so if you think that could be you, start polishing your CV, but don’t send anything until you see the advertisment please!

The Books

The books that are being supported by the ACE grant are:

This Poem Here – Poetry collection by Rob Walton (Just the audio book, as we’ve already done the rest)

Zed and the Cormorants -YA Novel by Clare Owen, illustrated by Sally Atkins. We are talking to Sophie Aldred about reading the audio book)

100neHundred -100 x 100 word stories by Laura Besley

Incorcisms -short, strange tales by David Hartley

Accidental Flowers -Novel in short stories by Lily Peters

Strange Waters -Short Story Collection by Jackie Taylor

Jackie

A Voice Coming from Then – Poetry collection (illustrated with collages) by Jeremy Dixon

An Anthology of poems and short fiction from UK based Deaf writers (no title yet) edited by Lisa Kelly and A N Other

Lisa

An Anthology of poems and short stories from UK based Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Writers (no title yet) edited by Laila Sumpton and Sandra A. Agard

Solstice Shorts 2021 Anthology (provisional theme: time is running out but we’ll come up with a better title!)

Tymes Two Weeks Away

The 2020 Solstice Shorts Festival, Tymes Goe by Turnes is 2 weeks away. Join us on 21st December 2020 at 8pm GMT for music, poetry and short fiction all written especially for the festival, from writers all over the UK and beyond, performed by actors, and some of the authors.

Some of the performances will be live, but we have videos made as back up – just in case.

get your tickets from Eventbrite suggested donation £5. Your £5 (or more!) ticket entitles you to a copy of the book half price, if you buy it, from us, QUICKLY.

Gwahoddwn feirdd Cymreig i fynegi eu diddordeb

[English version]

Mae gwasg Arachne Press yn eich gwahodd i gynnig cerddi gwreiddiol sy’n gysylltiedig efo’r A470 ar gyfer blodeugerdd.
Ar hyn o bryd nid oes ond angen mynegi diddordeb, er mwyn ein galluogi i wneud cais am nawdd.

Be ydi’r A470 i chi – siwrne dawel trwy harddwch Cymru neu daith araf a diddiwedd? Ai hon yw’r ffordd i adael, neu’r ffordd adref, neu ddechrau datganoli? Parciau Cenedlaethol, ffyrdd osgoi, llusgo mynd tu ôl i lori neu waeth fyth garafán, y ffordd i’r Sioe Frenhinol? Traethau, chwareli, pwerdai niwclear, awyrennau rhyfel, coedwigoedd, mynyddoedd, Bwlch yr Oerddrws, Pen y Fan? Taith ddiriaethol ar y tarmac neu daith o fath gwahanol? Does dim rhaid dehongli’r A470 yn llythrennol.

Mentrodd Arachne Press, gwasg fechan yn Llundain, i fyd cyhoeddi barddoniaeth Gymraeg am y tro cyntaf trwy gyhoeddi Mamiaith gan Ness Owen. Fe wnaethom fwynhau’r broses o gyfieithu’r cerddi o Gymraeg i Saesneg ac o Saesneg i Gymraeg, felly dyma ni’n ôl yn awyddus i wneud mwy dan ofal Ness a’i chyd-olygydd Sian Northey (awgrym Sian oedd y teitl A470). Mae hyn yn rhan o’n cynllun ar gyfer y tair blynedd nesaf ac rydym yn rhagweld y byddwn yn cyhoeddi’r gyfrol yn yr hydref 2022. Byddwn hefyd yn cyhoeddi blodeugerddi eraill – cerddi Albanaidd, cerddi gan feirdd B.M.E. a cherddi gan feirdd Byddar – gyda ‘Mapio’ yn thema gyffredinol i’r cyfan.

Rydym yn edrych am gerddi sydd heb eu cyhoeddi eisoes, gan feirdd Cymraeg a Chymreig lle bynnag maent yn byw, a beirdd sydd yn byw yng Nghymru.

Rydym yn edrych am wreiddioldeb: cerddi teimladwy, neu gerddi sy’n herio, cerddi caeth neu gerddi rhydd.

NI fyddwn yn derbyn erotica, arswyd, trais dianghenraid, rhywiaeth, hiliaeth, na homoffobia.

Rydym yn annog cyfraniadau gan leisiau sydd yn cael eu tangynrychioli, gan gynnwys beirdd o gefndiroedd ethnig amrywiol, beirdd LGBTQ, beirdd â phrofiad o amddifadedd economaidd-gymdeithasol, a menywod.

Bydd hon yn flodeugerdd gyfan gwbl ddwyieithog, yn dathlu gwychder y ddwy iaith, ac yn dathlu doniau beirdd a chyfieithwyr.

Gallwch gynnig cerddi yn Gymraeg, yn Saesneg, neu yn y ddwy iaith. Bydd cerddi sy’n cael eu derbyn mewn un iaith yn unig yn cael eu cyfieithu – gan y bardd ei hun neu gan gyfieithwyr profiadol gan gynnwys Sian Northey, un o’r golygyddion.

Y nod yw trin y ddwy iaith yn gyfartal ac fe fydd y cyfieithiadau yn cael eu gosod ochr yn ochr â’r gwreiddiol. Golyga hyn na all yr un gerdd, na’i chyfieithiad, fod yn fwy na 27 llinell, gan gynnwys y bylchau rhwng penillion. Bydd lle yn y gyfrol ar gyfer uchafswm o 50 o gerddi a’u cyfieithiadau.

Telir breindal i’r beirdd, ond mae’n annhebygol y bydd tâl o flaen llaw am y cerddi – bydd hynny’n dibynnu ar y nawdd a dderbynnir.

Gadewch i ni wybod a oes genych ddiddordeb cyfrannu cerdd/cerddi trwy’r ddolen hon https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit dyddiad cau 8 Ionawr 2021

Gallwch gysylltu â ni yn Gymraeg neu Saesneg. Y cyfan sydd ei angen ar hyn o bryd yw eich enw a’ch manylion cyswllt a pharagraff byr amdanoch gan gynnwys, os yw’n berthnasol, wybodaeth am waith sydd wedi’i gyhoeddi eisoes.

Expressions of interest invited from Welsh poets

Arachne Press are looking for poems linked to The A470

Expressions of interest only at this stage, so that we can make a clear proposal to funders.  

[feriswn Gymraeg]

Arguably the most famous road in Wales, the A470 is 186 miles from shore to shore through the backbone of Wales, linking north to south. 

Peaceful and picturesque or slow and never-ending, what does the A470 mean to you? The road out of here, the road home, the beginnings of devolution? Glorious national parks, bypasses, being stuck behind a certain lorry firm, or worse, a caravan, the road to the Royal Welsh? From the seashore to slates, from nuclear power stations and fighter plane flypasts to forests and mountains: Bwlch yr Oerddrws, Pen Y Fan. On the road or on a journey, there’s no need to take the A470 too literally.

Arachne Press’ first foray into Welsh language poetry came from the publication of Ness Owen’s Mamiaith (Mother Tongue). We enjoyed the translation process both Welsh to English and English to Welsh and we’re back for more, with Ness and fellow editor Sian Northey, who helped with those translations, at the helm. (Sian takes credit for the brilliant A470 idea.) This is part of our plan for the next three years and we anticipate publication in Autumn 2022.

We want unpublished  poems from Welsh poets wherever you are, and all other poets living in Wales.

We are looking for the unanticipated: sensitive poems, or poems that challenge, in traditional forms and new forms.

NO Erotica, horror, gratuitous violence, sexism, racism, or homophobia.

We actively encourage submissions from underrepresented voices, including ethnically diverse poets, LGBTQ poets, poets with experience of multiple socio-economic deprivation and women poets. Where relevant we encourage you to also submit to our Deaf anthology and our B.M.E. anthology (call out coming soon).

This will be a fully bilingual anthology, celebrating the magnificence of both languages, and the artistry of both poets and translators.

Poems may be submitted in Welsh, English or in both languages. Poems that are submitted in one language only will be translated – either by the poet themselves or experienced translators, including our editor, Sian Northey.  

We aim to give Welsh and English equal weight and the translations will be laid out side by side. This does mean each poem, regardless of language, can only be 27 lines including title and spaces between stanzas. We have room for a maximum of 50 poems plus their translation.

We will definitely pay royalties, but are not expecting to pay advances – that will depend on funding.

Tell us you are interested (in either language or both) via this link. https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

Deadline 8th January 2021

All we need at this stage is your name and contact details and a short biographical paragraph including previous publications if relevant.

Ballast by Diana Powell, BSL Translation by Marcel Hirshman

Diana Powell‘s shocking story of casual cruelty and medieval sailors, BSL translation by Marcel Hirshman.

We are currently crowdfunding for this year’s festival and anthology, Tymes goe by Turnes. We have some lovely unusual handmade rewards, and some nice standard T shirt/ Book/ Badge type things, If you felt like supporting us you can do so over on Pay it Forward.

Final cover design reveal for Tymes goe by Turnes

cover design by Kevin Threlfall

Cover designs are always a bit of a thing – we work with lots of designers, but over the years, when I am devoid of ideas for a cover, I go to Kevin Threlfall – he has many talents and many styles and we work well together. I sent him the Southwell poem, just as I had with the musicians and writers, and he responded with several possible designs.

The ideas were so rich and varied this year I had to draft in the writers to vote, and they overwhelmingly went with the design that gave a nod to the winter sun black and gold/orange theme we’ve had from the very first festival, but of course Kevin has made it his own. Then we did a bit more tweaking, so that the original single bird became several (the saddest birdes a season find to singe), and the solshorts logo replaced the words in the original.

The book is being proofed this week, final sign off next week and off to the printers shortly after!

We are crowdfunding to raise money to print the book, and pay performers (and writers) for the festival. there’s a week left to go, so if you fancied supporting us, here’s the link

Or you can preorder a copy of the book NOW. we will only be printing enough to cover preorders and a small batch for shops and the actual event, so if you want to guarantee a copy please order now!

And the winner is

We had only one correct answer to our quiz. I didn’t think it was THAT difficult!

Congratulations Joanne Williams!

Lockdown Interview no 30 An email conversation between Pippa Gladhill and Kirsty Fox

26th May. 12.25

Pippa Gladhill

Hi Kirsty,

Your story ‘They said there were Pirates,’ it’s compressed, shifting, allusive atmosphere has stayed with me long after I finished reading it.

I was hooked by the opening lines, it’s spare lyricism. I was hooked in fact by the absolute quality of your writing throughout.

“I’d been part of the water for so long now, it no longer felt like I was moving…. as though it were the planet that swayed to and fro. To and fro.”

By this power of repetition, like an incantation, by the meanings that work in layers, and open up by what you purposefully omit,

“You’re my only treasure’, she said, ‘I have nothing left to lose,” such an understatement of the depth of this woman’s loss.  

One of the ways it’s so effective in conveying the quality of dreamlike uncertainty is the way you mix the past, present and future throughout, by your use of verb tenses. Was this a technique you discovered as you wrote your story? Can you tell me more about it?

Pippa

26th May. 17.27

Hi Pippa,

Thank you for your kind words and astute reflections!

I think my habit of playing with tenses is related to my thoughts on how we perceive and experience time as a dynamic thing. Our experience of the present is always informed by our memories and past experiences and what we expect to happen. I think this is something I’m always trying to represent, often subconsciously. 

I wrote this piece (which I see as both flash fiction and prose poetry in a way) as a stream-of-consciousness and when I write in that way tenses often shift around. It’s only through the editing process that I really examine this and figure out how it adapts and reflects meaning and movement in the narrative. 

I originally wrote it without the first paragraph, but then I had a discussion with my friend who is the father of a small boy, and we felt the poetic reflections in the piece felt like an adult looking back to their childhood thoughts, rather than a child’s thoughts as they happen.

Exploring the perception of youngsters leads me nicely into your story which neighbours mine in the Dusk anthology. ‘In-between Dog’ has a protagonist Alice, who is herself in between — a preteen just starting secondary school and facing the transition into her teenage years. 

The point-of-view here uses the apparently naive worldview of a preteen as a tool to carry us through the narrative, revealing aspects of the setting and characters as we go. The subtlety of this was very effective in helping the reader build a picture of this family’s life through sparse information. It reminded me of something the writer and critic Jenn Ashworth said about how a good short story is like ‘a sliver of light between a pair of half-drawn curtains’. It reveals precisely what it needs to.

In this way, you hint at the magic realist element ‘the in-between’ while still holding something back, the way youngsters always hold something back from adults. The dog Loopy is brought into the family by one of her fathers, but its elemental nature seems to belong to her. 

What inspired this otherworldly aspect to the story and the relationship between Alice and the dog? 

Best wishes,

Kirsty

29th May. 16.55

Hi Kirsty,

And thank you, too, for your thoughts and nice question.

What inspired the other worldly aspect to my story is the French expression, quoted by Alice, about dusk being between dog and wolf.

This gift of an expression conveys, with vivid economy, the uncertainty of twilight when things are slipping and changing, and no longer what they appear during daylight hours. Imperceptible alteration, uncertainty, ambiguity – brilliant places for a story to start. And a wolf!  Who doesn’t love a wolf as the embodiment of ‘other’, a wilder, exhilarating, dangerous element. (As a side note, ‘wolf’ in French is le loup, and  ‘Loops’ became the English version) So I wanted to include this aspect of ‘wolfness’ in the story and also to leave it shadowy and understated in the same way the original expression conveys the meaning of not one thing nor the other. 

As you say, Alice is also in that in-between stage of life, neither child nor teen. She’s childlike in her strategy of magical thinking, that is, a belief that if you want something, then all you have to do is think it, for it to take place. And also older than her years in trying to protect her Dad and partner from the bully boys.  She came over as socially isolated so it felt like she would naturally develop a strong bond with Loops as her close friend and companion. And it felt right she had that yearning for things being wilder, playing alone in the park with Loops as it grows dark, connecting with something other, raw and alive, that exists just beneath the humdrum surface. 

Moving on to your story. Your opening lines, that place the piece, in the first instance, in the here and now before we find ourselves moving back and forth within memory and ambiguities of the dream like state. I want to ask you about the coin. The coin here – intimations of death, of betrayal, of treasure, poignant link with the memory of her brother.  The way to pay or buy their journey. So much is conveyed by this simple coin. Can you say more about it, and how the coin came to you as a way to contain these meanings.

All the best

Pippa

9th June. 17.28

Hi Pippa,

It’s funny, but the River Styx analogy didn’t consciously occur to me until you asked this question! And yet there it is. I think my starting point for the coin was the pirates. I dreamed many years ago that I was on a boat and pirates were coming. It was during a period where real-life Somali pirates were in the news a lot, robbing boats off the coast of Africa. And then more recently I was set a task to write on a political theme during the height of the most recent refugees-in-boats crisis. So I paired these two things together and the coin seemed like the perfect simple object for the child to be carrying (in realistic and symbolic terms). My focus when writing was the timelessness of the refugee flight, how this dance has been played out many times over, and the fragility of life in these circumstances ⁠— the bartering with the gods (metaphorical or literal) for a safe passage. 

I think what’s really interesting here is how the history of literature and storytelling can seep into what we’re writing without us knowing. So the coin gathers its own meaning and moves beyond the intentions of the author ⁠— so meaning in literature isn’t just what we put in but what the reader takes out.

There are certain stories, and ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ is a great example, which are ingrained into our psyche. Whenever I see someone falling down a hole in a movie, I think of Alice, whether it’s an intentional reference or not. I love these repeated patterns (or leitmotivs) and I think the wolf is another one which has so many layers of meaning attached to it. 

I’m curious, what other things do you write? Are you mainly focused on short fiction? What themes from ‘In-between’ connect this story to your other work?

Best wishes,

Kirsty 

20th June. 17.49

Hi Kirsty,

Finally!  Finally I get to think about what I most want to think about but which gets shoved to the back of the queue on a daily basis, partly because it needs time and I don’t want to dash off some unthinking quick response. 

Also … because I tend to allow what’s really important to me, to be overridden by other apparently more pressing demands. Which is what happens also with my writing. Which is a whole other topic that could be unpacked. ‘The most common problem writers have is not writing ‘(Mohsin Hamid). Anyway, I’m sorry for the delay and hope it doesn’t interrupt our flow too much. 

In answer to your question about what other things I write – I also write stage plays. Having written quite a bit of short fiction, I wanted to not exactly ‘move on’ but to develop and extend my writing skills.  

When I started script writing it was deeply weird. How is it possible to set up context? What about interiority? How can you tell a whole story with sub text, only through dialogue and physical action?  What about past and future how do you covey that?   The whole writing process is always a ongoing puzzle for me, but I do think the rudimentary script writing skills I’ve learnt have fed back and improved my short fiction writing as well. Refreshed it and enabled me to write more succinctly. Keeping to the point. Keeping it fresh and alive. 

As for themes. Someone (and I’m rubbish about remembering who says these things, I think it was a guy) he said about his own writing that although he’d been writing stories all his life  – in essence they were all part of his one big story. I find that liberating. I kind of know what he means. It’s as if we return to the same undercurrents all of the time. To answer the other part of your question about ‘In between’ and how it connects to other writing themes of mine, I’ve not often written from a young person’s point of view.  But there was something about the Dusk brief that I found compelling and the fact I could bring in a wolf of course, and maybe the element of the unknown wildness theme is part of a general theme I allude to without being deliberately conscious of doing so. 

The other thing about In Between is I wrote it rapidly and relatively easily. Most of the time it doesn’t happen like this. Normally a lot of stalling and not knowing how to make my writing work. Hours, days, in changes, repetitive, obsessive rewrites, and tweaks. It’s never, ever perfect, it could always be better. 

I also think I only ever learn how to write the particular story or play I’m on. Each new project is like starting from scratch with no idea how to do it.

Which leads me on to wanting to ask you a three-part question.  Firstly, have you too written in other genres and if so what led you into this? Also, what led you into writing in the first place?  And lastly, more of an impossible question really, can you tell me more about the process of your writing, what is your process, how do you locate what your story is actually about, how do you bring it to any sort of completion? 

All the best

Pippa


5th July. 17.33

Hi Pippa,

I really identify with what you said about prioritsing our writing and also the type of writing we’re doing. I’m currently finishing a part-time Creative Writing MA. I decided to do the MA in order to prioritise my writing more in my life as, as you say, more ‘pressing matters’ tend to take over—things which have actual deadlines or family crises or a great big fat pandemic, you know, the usual.

This worked in some respects because it gave me deadlines and classmates to bounce ideas off and a set amount of time to really develop my writing. However, it dragged me away from writing my novel. It put other ‘parts’ of my creativity on the backburner by making other writing more pressing. So it did radically change my priorities but didn’t exactly fix the problem. I’ve found having a mentor and writing buddies or groups the best way to help prioritise my writing by creating accountability. In fact, I actually planned out a workshop I would deliver a year or so ago on helping writers to find the space in their life for their writing but it didn’t happen for various reasons. 

In terms of form and genre, I now have 3-4 areas of writing I work in depending on how you categorise and delineate. For short work I tend to write either prose poetry or short fiction or some hybrid of the two. Then I write novels – I have self-published one climate-fiction novel about 7-8 years ago, have my first draft of my second full novel and two other half-worked ones waiting in the wings. These are largely speculative fiction of the Margaret-Atwood-type variety, often set in the near future with themes around the environment, identity and society. Lastly, my MA has introduced me to the lyric essay and other hybrid forms which combine elements of poetry, fiction, memoir and essay with various experiments slipped in through the cracks between form and genre. I’ve fallen a bit in love with these and my dissertation (which I’ve just started in the last few weeks) is in that hybrid style.

To the question of what led to what. I have always written stories since I was little. I was one of those precocious children who started their first ‘novel’ at age 8 (about a family of foxes and very much a rip off of Colin Dann). I didn’t find an idea for a novel I could actually stick with to the bitter end until my mid-twenties and wrote a lot of short stories and half novels instead. I also started writing these stream-of-conscious pieces which I really couldn’t categorise until I finally realised they were prose poetry. I was always terrible at traditional poetry so I think I was in denial that that’s what they were but I’ve embraced this now, though I still have imposter syndrome when I speak to ‘real’ poets.

In terms of process, most things I write which are concept-based tend to start with a dream. Much of my dreams are nonsense but now and then my subconscious throws out some brilliant lump of clay for me to shape into a real thing. The less concept-based stuff comes from free-writing and stream-of-consciousness. I just write and see what comes out and sometimes it’s good enough to form into something else. I do write more than one thing at once and jump around a lot and I guess the ones I go back to and actually finish are the ones which still spark my interest over time. My editing process is first me and then other writers. I’ve been in various critiques groups and worked with an editor on my first novel which all helped me develop my craft and ability to self-edit. Now I have two close friends who write in a similar oeuvre and the three of us share work around. I find feedback really essential to my process now.

In terms of planning things out, I’m the ‘gardener’ not the ‘architect’ writer type (if you’ve heard that analogy). I plant things and nurture them and see how they grow in the world rather than planning everything out to the nth degree before writing it. With novels, I don’t write everything in chapter order, so I do have to organise and create a framework as I go so as not to get completely lost. 

In terms of ‘finding what the story is really about’ I think putting something aside and coming back to it is key. Sometimes for a week, sometimes longer. The novel I am writing now started as a short story based on a dream many years ago. I lost my way with it and put it aside. About four years ago a life-event suddenly chimed very deeply with the themes in this story and I saw it more clearly and realised it was too complex for a short thing, so I began developing it into a novel. I like what you said/quoted about everything we write being our story in a way. I think I write because it helps me understand the world and the life I’m living and the people I’m living it with, even if I’m writing about a place I’ve never been or a thing I’ve never directly experienced, it all still relates back. 

I’m interested in what you say about differences with playwriting and how the differences feed back into your handle on short stories. I’m a writer who really enjoys writing dialogue (I know many who don’t). I feel that’s where my characters change from some half-formed idea into a person that takes on a life of their own. How do you find writing dialogue? What have you learned from plays about the art of subtext which has informed your story writing? Also how do you feel about directors taking a script you’ve written as a basis and doing something different with it? Are you comfortable with giving up some creative control?

Best wishes,

Kirsty

14th July, 21.34

Hi Kirsty,

It’s interesting to hear you decided to do the MA to help you prioritise your writing in your life, and yet it also takes you away from other areas of your writing work that you feel are equally essential. 

Yes, it often feels like this to me –  no matter what writing I’m on, there’s always other work languishing in the background that needs attention, and completion, and just getting round to actually SENDING out! 

And intriguing to hear about the hybrid genre, that sounds so fresh and creative, in addition to your prose poems and longer form fiction. Sounds like such rich and fertile ways to work. 

Other writers who critique your work and whose insights you trust, are true gold.

I think you must finish that story about the family of foxes btw!

Re your climate crisis novel, I’ve found much of my recent work has involved floods, or trees, without intending for the work to go that way.

To your question about dialogue writing and if I find it easy, what’s weird is that in a play script I can find it deceptively easy, but not so much so, in short fiction. I say ‘deceptive’ as it’s very easy to allow irrelevant dialogue to meander along and really snag up the action, when, like in any form actually, every single word has to have its purpose and momentum.

The useful things I’m learning from script writing, that hopefully do feed back into short stories, pretty basic really, is succinctness, creating an ‘atmosphere’ between characters from what they do, rather than what they say, to have characters say one thing but mean something else. I love the immediacy of theatre, its here and now ness. 

Did you, by any chance, catch ‘LUNGS’ by Duncan Macmillan that was performed live on stage to an empty auditorium and streamed from the Old Vic just a week ago or so?  It’s one of the most extraordinary pieces of theatre writing I’ve seen. So beautifully and intelligently crafted. An absolute class act in how much to leave out and allow the audience/reader to understand. One of my lockdown high points. They sold ’seats’ as if it was a live performance to an audience, so it was limited each night to the capacity of the theatre.

To answer your question about what it’s like to hand work over to directors and giving up creative control. I think of my script as the starting point for the performance and the director and actors bring their range of skills to make of it what they will, and that’s fine as long as they’re true to the intentions of the piece and the writing.  Writers aren’t massively welcome in the rehearsal room normally, but whenever I’ve been allowed in, I’m fascinated by the process. By the serious playfulness of it, or maybe it’s the playful seriousness.

All the best

Pippa

Pippa Gladhill has been published by us in Solstice Shorts: Sixteen Stories about Time, Dusk and Noon, and forthcoming in Tymes Goe by Turnes.

Kirsty Fox has been published by us in Dusk.

You can buy all these books from our webshop – take a look at special offers too – we have a bulk buy offer for Solstice Shorts books

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