Summer Solstice

The Summer Solstice is tonight at 22:43 BST (well, that’s when it is in London, anyway).

I’m not going to stay up! but I might tune in for the sunset and sunrise at Stone Henge.

In the meantime, writers, musicians, you have until 23:59 BST tomorrow to submit your offering for the Solstice Shorts Festival. So maybe you will be staying up to see the Solstice in?

See you on the other side.

Tymes Goe by Turnes – Call Out for Solstice Shorts 2020

Before I ran Arachne Press, I did many things, including, for quite a while, a job I hated. While in that job, I had as my screensaver/lock/background the words

Tymes Goe By Turnes, and Chaunces Chang by Course

I felt better every time I saw them.

Looking back, it’s pretty obvious I should have left the job, rather than comfort myself with the fact that something else would cause a change.  It’s also pretty obvious I had depression, which is why I couldn’t make the change for myself, and partly why I hated the job, to be entirely fair to my then employer.

The lines are from Robert Southwell (c. 1561 – 21 February 1595), who had plenty to be worried and unhappy about. Look him up if you want to feel better about your current situation by comparison, if that’s not the sort of comfort that moves you, (me neither) read the poem, which is at the end of this post; it’ll work better, promise. (There is a bit of God in it, I don’t subscribe but RS did, and it doesn’t spoil the poem for me).

WHY am I sharing this poem with you?

Because I really should be planning this year’s Solstice Shorts Festival, but I don’t know if it will go ahead.

Because Covid-19 might still be preventing us (hope not, it is the end of December!). Because Arts Council is in emergency funding mode and may not want to know about funding it.

Because if either of these, where and how can we be true to the basic live-ness of Solstice Shorts?

Anyway, I am a planner by nature, so I will plan the bits I can, and wait to see what chances change by which courses.

We always have a time theme, so here it is.

WRITERS/MUSICIANS I keep seeing on Facer and Twitbook that in the absence of paid work, you are knuckling down to projects and upping your rejection rates, so here’s another one for you.

Write a story or poem or song that responds or reacts or is inspired by the poem Tymes goe by Turns, or some concept in it. (also open to musical settings of the actual poem – I think there is at least one already.

We want enormous change, finding balance, release… just leave God out of it, ok? Solstice Shorts has a pagan undertow because of the day we hold it, and personally I’m a heathen, so any overtly godly piece will be automatically excluded. (21st December, shortest day of the year, winter solstice.)

If the worst happens and we can’t hold the festival this year (though we are incredibly ingenious) we will just put it off to 2021, and have the book ready to launch at the festival. It’ll be fine. We’ll work it out, but please be prepared for the possibility of a twelve month delay.

https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

Deadline 21st June 2020.

Here’s the poem, and audio of the lovely Math Jones reading it for us as a special favour

The lopped tree in tyme may grow agayne;
Most naked plants renew both frute and floure;
The soriest wight may find release of payne,
The dryest soyle suck in some moystning shoure;
Tymes go by turnes and chaunces chang by course,
From foule to fayre, from better happ to worse.

The sea of Fortune doth not ever floe,
She drawes her favours to the lowest ebb;
Her tyde hath equall tymes to come and goe,
Her loom doth weave the fine and coarsest webb;
No joy so great but runneth to an ende,
No happ so harde but may in fine amende.

Not allwayes fall of leafe nor ever spring,
No endless night yet not eternall daye;
The saddest birdes a season find to singe,
The roughest storme a calm may soone alaye;
Thus with succeding turnes God tempereth all,
That man may hope to rise yet feare to fall.

A chaunce may wynne that by mischance was lost;
The nett that houldes no greate, takes little fish;
In some thinges all, in all thinges none are croste,
Fewe all they neede, but none have all they wishe;
Unmedled joyes here no man befall,
Who least hath some, who most hath never all.

Spiders Galore – feedback on the 8th Anniversary submissions

Well that was a suprise. When we cranked open the vault at Submittable to see what you’d sent us, there were hundreds of stories and poems in there! Like a spider nest full of baby spiderlings. We thought spiderlit was a niche of minute proportions, but it turns out lots of you share our passion for creatives with eight legs and a talent for weaving.

This does mean a lot of reading. We will do it as fast as we can! Definite ‘No’s will be out fairly quickly, but then we’ll have to compare the ‘maybe’s and the ‘yes’es and see what’s what. There already some themes and similarities rising from the mass, so we’ll need to decide if some pieces are too similar, and so on.

Please be patient!

Inspired by Lady Hale – a Spider anthology for our eighth anniversary

Inspired by Lady Hale I’ve been buying spider brooches (and that T-shirt that’s also supporting Shelter), like a mad thing, and then I thought…

Next August (8th Month) is Arachne Press’s 8th anniversary. What about an eight-legged arachnid inspired anthology?

Get writing, I’ll put a proper call out later in the week but maybe 2000 words-ish, deadline January-ish.

I’m going to make it difficult for you – NO Horror, NO spiders to be killed.

Think Charlotte’s Web for adults, not Arachnophobia. Some sort of homeless connection too? More when I’ve had time to consider properly.

I’ve resisted the temptation to use a close-up photo of a spider here. Imagine one.

 

Solstice Shorts – be quick

Here’s Marika Josef reading her poem, Still No Name from last year’s Solstice Shorts Anthology, Noon. As you can see, there is a book, and there are events, nearly six months after the festival. It’s not just about the shortest day of the year.

If you haven’t already sent us something there are only days left to submit… 21st June 23:59 BST.

MAX 2000 words, and make sure it’s to theme. (Time and Tide – historical, set by the sea, strong female characters)

Shuffle over to Submittable to get all the gen. You too might be reading in a brewery come this time next year.

The Tide is ebbing

Submissions for Time & Tide close on Friday. We’ve been going on about this for a week or so, and are getting tired of the sound of our own voices, so we aren’t going to remind you  (not here, anyway) again. Get your oar in the water and start paddling.

Historical, marine and riverine (is that a word?) theme, with strong female characters.

Stories and poems, ESPECIALLY stories, we’ve had a lot of poetry in: 2000 word limit, original, unpublished and in English, BSL, Portuguese, Scots Gaelic, Doric, or Welsh – with an English version for anything not in English.

Songs to theme in any language, send us a translation though, 5  min maximum, Original or Traditional – nothing that is someone else’s copyright. You, or someone you’ve organised to do it, needs to be able to perform at one of the venues: Aberdeen, Glasgow, Maryport, Holyhead, Greenwich, Hastings, Lisbon and possibly Brighton.

https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

 

To get you in the mood here’s video of Michelle Penn reading Ian Grosz’s poem Autumn Noon, from last year’s festival, Noon; performed at Brockley Max Festival at Brockley Brewery.

 

 

 

Solstice approaches

In 12 days the Summer Solstice occurs, and with it the close of Submissions for this year’s Solstice Shorts Festival, Time and Tide, which will be held on December 21st 2019.

Heading to the coast, and to tidal rivers, we are looking for stories poems and songs with an historical ring to them, from writers anywhere in the world. We are looking for live music too, traditional or original – no cover versions! But if you want to sing or play you need to be local to one of our sites, which are…

Aberdeen, Maryport, Holyhead, Greenwich, Hastings, Lisbon (Portugal) and possibly Brighton.

If you are thinking aww, why isn’t there anywhere near me, and you are willing to do the organising (find a venue on the coast or a tidal river, and readers, and publicise the jolly roger out of it), get in touch!

Currently we have LOADS of poems, and hardly any stories, so get a shuffle on short story writers.

We want stories that engage with the sea, in an historical way. so pirates (if you must!), merchant ships, silver darlings, migration, dock workers and ship builders, that sort of thing, but before it turns too macho, remember that the Suffragette magazine was called Time and Tide (because they wait for no man).

We are keen to include stories (in particular) from BAME writers, women, writers with disabilities (esp Deaf writers – you can send BSL video), LGBT writers.

we will also accept works (provided they come with a translation) in Portuguese, Scots Gaelic, Doric and Welsh.

You don’t have long left – Time and Tide won’t wait… via submittable only, where you will find LOTS more info.

https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

In the meantime, here’s a video of one of the poems from last year’s NOON, read last week in the delightful Brockley Brewery, for the Brockley Max Festival, Michelle Penn reading Mandy Macdonald’s Arthur Streeton Advises his Students.

 

Solstice Shorts 2018 submissions open

This year’s Solstice Shorts Festival (21st December 2018) will again be a multi-site affair, and again will last only 45 minutes. But this time will happen at exactly the same time – Noon.

At the moment we are looking at events in Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Carlisle, Ynys Mon (Anglesey), and London.

We are looking for SHORT stories no more than 1000 words, shorter is better, (think flash not vignette – something needs to happen!) and poems, also short – up to 40 lines, in English, Welsh or Scots/Gaelic (with a translation please!) On the Theme of Noon – deadlines, midday meals, heat and light – whatever it means to you (We are strict though- afternoon is not noon!) These works are for performance. Other sites may be added.

We are starting this process with no funding, but hope we may have some in time to allow us to pay actors to perform, but if not, we’ll need you to be able to get to one of these sites to read.

Celebrate the shortest day of the year by sending us a story or poem on the theme of NOON.

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 7TH OCTOBER!

A pamphlet (or a very slender book!) of the stories and poems chosen for performance will be produced. Royalties will be paid, together with at least one copy of the book to each successful writer.

Writers who are successful in being included in a performance/ anthology are subsequently invited to submit a collection/novel for consideration.

submission via Submittable only (this is so we don’t lose your submission, and so multiple people can review your work as simply as possible.)

call out: Story Cities

A note from our friends at University of Greenwich

 Story Cities – a call for flash fictions
‘The city is redundant: it repeats itself so that something will stick in the mind . . .
Memory is redundant: it repeats signs so that the city can begin to exist’
– Marco Polo to Kublai Khan in Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities

In Calvino’s masterful work, Marco Polo explores images of distant cities where time, space, objects and individuals are presented in visions. Each description is filled with varying degrees of enchantment, absurdity, impossibility and allure.
The weaving of these accounts questions what is real and unreal; recollections of disparate lands invoke the realisation that perhaps all reveal a single place so that:
‘the more one was lost in unfamiliar quarters of distant cities, the more one understood the other cities he had crossed to arrive there’ (Calvino).
The city is a place where populations meet and strangers pass one another. Where stories are created, told, remembered and discarded. One city connects us to the memory or spirit of another; repeating rituals and behaviours which provide spectacle for the tourist
and uniformity for the global citizen. As we move within the city we operate within the systems that transport us, the signs that guide us, the encounters that confront us and the thoughts which carry us.

Brief – call for submissions
This brief invites submissions for new short works of fiction in any genre that address the theme of the city. It asks you to explore the journeys we take; the situations we encounter and interact with; the dialogues and connections we make – in order to highlight universally shared experiences and understandings of the city and / or imagine them
differently.

Working under one (per story) of the following themes:
the Market, Square, Café, Hotel, Park, Station and Port, Main Street, Side Street, Crossroads, On the train, On the bus / tram – writers are asked to create narratives that speak of / to / through the city.

Story Cities is a collaborative research project initiated by lecturers at the University of Greenwich, London
Rosamund Davies, Senior Lecturer in Media and Creative Writing and
Kam Rehal, Senior Lecturer in Graphic and Digital Design. It explores ways in which
stories might respond to, reference, reflect and reimagine the city. Selected works will be published in a physical book that readers can carry into cities – to experience the city through stories. Acting as guides, companions and tools for reflection, we hope that the stories can encourage the reader to experience the city differently.

You are invited to participate in this project by submitting new short works of fiction in any genre that address the theme of the city.

Guidance
There are a set of guidelines that we ask contributors to work with:
1. All contributors must be aged 18 and over
2. Each story can be between 1–500 words in length (no longer), excluding title
3. Up to 3 stories may be submitted by each contributor
4. Names of specific places must not be used – nor should characters be given names. Your story should be written so that it works in any city
5. All submissions must be works of fiction and the author’s own work, unpublished and in English. If this work is under consideration elsewhere you must inform us immediately if it is accepted
6. All work must be submitted with author’s name and a contact email – please do not supply any additional contact details at this stage
7. All work must be submitted by the named author and he/she must hold rights to the material
8. All contributors must sign and complete the consent form and submit this with
their work(s)*
9. There will be no monetary reward for inclusion in the publication but a copy of the book will be presented to each contributor. Copyright will be retained by the author, with licence for exclusive publication for a to-be-agreed period not exceeding one year.
Once we have received and considered all submissions we will edit an initial selection of stories for publication.

If you have any questions please contact:
Kam Rehal and Rosamund Davies at the University of Greenwich on: StoryCities@gre.ac.uk
+44(0)20 8331 9013

SUBMIT TO StoryCities@gre.ac.uk
Deadline for submissions: 16/09/2018

*email the submissions address to get the form

 

An Outbreak of Peace – submissions closed

Thank you to all the 185 people who have submitted. We will be reading over the next couple of weeks and will get back to you as soon as possible.