The Knotsman – The route the trouble takes

A series of poems that make up the core of the collection by Math Jones, The Knotsman.

In which lovers are separated, by the undoing of a knot, and the Knotsman discovers the consequences.

The Tide is ebbing

Submissions for Time & Tide close on Friday. We’ve been going on about this for a week or so, and are getting tired of the sound of our own voices, so we aren’t going to remind you  (not here, anyway) again. Get your oar in the water and start paddling.

Historical, marine and riverine (is that a word?) theme, with strong female characters.

Stories and poems, ESPECIALLY stories, we’ve had a lot of poetry in: 2000 word limit, original, unpublished and in English, BSL, Portuguese, Scots Gaelic, Doric, or Welsh – with an English version for anything not in English.

Songs to theme in any language, send us a translation though, 5  min maximum, Original or Traditional – nothing that is someone else’s copyright. You, or someone you’ve organised to do it, needs to be able to perform at one of the venues: Aberdeen, Glasgow, Maryport, Holyhead, Greenwich, Hastings, Lisbon and possibly Brighton.

https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

 

To get you in the mood here’s video of Michelle Penn reading Ian Grosz’s poem Autumn Noon, from last year’s festival, Noon; performed at Brockley Max Festival at Brockley Brewery.

 

 

 

The Knotsman in church

The Knotsman took up residence at St Hilda’s Church for Brockley Max at the beginning or the month.

Math Jones read about an hour’s worth of material from the book, which gave time to explore different strands, over the next few days we will be pulling together those strands in most a un-knotsman-like way, and see what happens.

Here are a couple of church related pieces

I owe that Mother Lichgate ha’f a shillin’

and

The Undoer of Knots

Have you submitted to Time and Tide yet?

Time and Tide wait for no man, and no woman, neither. Summer Solstice approaches and with it the deadline for submissions to this year’s festival and anthology.

That’s the 21st June, people. One minute to midnight.

submit here

We are looking for an historical slant on life on, or by, the sea. and don’t forget that Time and Tide was the name of the Suffragette magazine, so we want to be overwhelmed by how cleverly you weave that in to your work. submit here

2000 words max no minimum. stories and poems.

Songs (original to the performer or traditional only) and poem films (film poems?) max five mins.

We want unusual voices, and we about diversity, so tell all your friends to get writing too, we need a lot of material, so don’t keep it to yourselves. submit here

We have sites in England, Scotland, Wales and Portugal. I know. Overseas. If you are a musician you need to be near one of the sites, everyone else, anywhere in the world.

loads more info and submit, here

To get you in the mood, here’s a video of a poem from last year’s Noon, being read last week at this year’s Brockley Max festival.

Laila Sumpton reads her poem, Mad Dogs and Englishmen at the Brockley Brewery

Solstice approaches

In 12 days the Summer Solstice occurs, and with it the close of Submissions for this year’s Solstice Shorts Festival, Time and Tide, which will be held on December 21st 2019.

Heading to the coast, and to tidal rivers, we are looking for stories poems and songs with an historical ring to them, from writers anywhere in the world. We are looking for live music too, traditional or original – no cover versions! But if you want to sing or play you need to be local to one of our sites, which are…

Aberdeen, Maryport, Holyhead, Greenwich, Hastings, Lisbon (Portugal) and possibly Brighton.

If you are thinking aww, why isn’t there anywhere near me, and you are willing to do the organising (find a venue on the coast or a tidal river, and readers, and publicise the jolly roger out of it), get in touch!

Currently we have LOADS of poems, and hardly any stories, so get a shuffle on short story writers.

We want stories that engage with the sea, in an historical way. so pirates (if you must!), merchant ships, silver darlings, migration, dock workers and ship builders, that sort of thing, but before it turns too macho, remember that the Suffragette magazine was called Time and Tide (because they wait for no man).

We are keen to include stories (in particular) from BAME writers, women, writers with disabilities (esp Deaf writers – you can send BSL video), LGBT writers.

we will also accept works (provided they come with a translation) in Portuguese, Scots Gaelic, Doric and Welsh.

You don’t have long left – Time and Tide won’t wait… via submittable only, where you will find LOTS more info.

https://arachnepress.submittable.com/submit

In the meantime, here’s a video of one of the poems from last year’s NOON, read last week in the delightful Brockley Brewery, for the Brockley Max Festival, Michelle Penn reading Mandy Macdonald’s Arthur Streeton Advises his Students.

 

Writing the Past: Math Jones The Knotsman

Math Jones kicks off our Writing the Past event for Hither Green Festival representing the 17th Century with stories and poems from  from The Knotsman,

Writing the Past – Kate Foley

Kate Foley reading from both her collections, The Don’t Touch Garden, and A Gift of Rivers at our Writing the Past event for Hither Green Festival at Manor House Library on Saturday.

Kate is next reading at Fourth Friday, at the Poetry Cafe,Betterton Street London, this Friday

Brockley Max 2019 Noon and Knots

We are involved in Brockley Max Festival again this year, with readings in a church, and a brewery!

Sunday 2nd June 7pm

St Hilda’s Church Courtrai Road SE23 1PL

Math Jones will be reading from his new poetry-collection-as-novel, The Knotsman

The Knotsman does not exist, you will not find him in history books or collections of ‘bygone’ skills. But there he is, going from house to house, village to village, poem to poem, battlefield to gallows, unravelling knots and problems, physical, emotional and psychological; a new kind of cunning man, not always welcome, not always quite as clever as his fingers and picks would have him believe.

copyright Tyrone Lewis

Wednesday 5th June 7pm

We will be at the lovely Brockley Brewery, 31 Harcourt Road London SE4 2AJ

for NOON

Readings of poetry and short stories on the theme of Noon from the Solstice Shorts Anthology of the same name

Everyone thinks of noon as being a split second as the clock’s hands draw together, the bell tolls twelve times – but there is so much more to it than that.

with

Stuart McKenzie, Michelle Penn, Laila Sumpton, Marika Joseph, Liam Hogan

Happy birthday Shakespeare and a consideration of knots

Is it actually Will’s birthday? No one knows, but there is a tradition that ties it to 23rd April because he was baptised on the 26th.

Anyway happy birthday Will.

As we recently published Math JonesThe Knotsman, which is set about a century after Shakespeare’s time and in Worcestershire, rather than Warwickshire, and is in any case, a not quite historie, as Shakespeare’s histories are not quite historie, I’ve been looking for links.

this is  not quite research – a lighthearted look at the knot in Shakespeare.

Was Shakespeare a knotsman, or did he know someone who was?

He uses knot to mean a group of people, often when that group is not entirely to be trusted, and ocassionally to mean a meeting of said group.

And to mean a contract, or bond, particularly of marriage.

He shall not knit a knot in his fortunes with the finger of my substance
Page, of a suitor in Merry Wives of Windsor

I’ll have this knot knit up tomorrow morning
Capulet, when Juliet submits to the marriage with Paris Romeo & Juliet

Cressid is mine, tied with the bonds of heaven… The bonds of heaven are slipped, dissolv’d, and loos’d; And with another knot, five-finger-tied,
Troilus and Cressida, when Troilus discovers Cressida is promised to another.

To hold you in perpetual amity, To make you brothers, and to knit your hearts
With an unslipping knot …
Agrippa proposing a marriage in Anthony & Cleopatra

Math Jones takes this imagery literally and has his characters tie, and untie, betrothal ropes, with terrible consequences. Lives and loves unravel, and the Knotsman must run for his life.

Math is in Worcester, the Knotsman’s stomping ground, tonight, reading alongside Claire Trévien and Charley Barnes at the Hive. see facebook event

Knot pictures from the recent Anni Albers exhibition at Tate Modern

Final Video from the Launch of The Knotsman

Math Jones reads Mr Swarthye

 

at the launch of The Knotsman

You can buy the book direct from us at our web shop (post free in the UK)

Next live reading
TOMORROW! Tuesday 23rd April 7pm
The Hive, Sawmill Walk, The Butts, Worcester, WR1 3PD