Update 4: Funding for BSL Project 14-12-21 Half Way!

What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is selling steadily. If you want a copy before Christmas, please order by Friday for absolute certainty.

This has been an exciting project and we had planned to make the entire book available as BSL videos for free.

We have been uploading videos of BSL versions of the poems and stories daily, here, some are already captioned, some will have to wait for more funds, but we thought better to have them without captions for now, than not share them at all.

We will pause shortly to concentrate on our latest book, Words From the Brink, and the Solstice Shorts Festival, coming back to sharing the BSL in the new year.

What Meets the Eye?

It has proved FAR more complicated and expensive than we first thought, and our budget of £4k [provided by ACE] has proved hopelessly inadequate, despite being based on actual costs for other BSL translation work. We are doing our best to achieve what we set out to do, but it’s a hand to mouth existance, being a small independant publisher – we don’t have assets or savings or a head office to bail us out. We need help.

We told our mailing list about the problem and have been tweeting regularly, and posting here – With book sales added to to the total we have now raised £1323, just over half of what we need – there is still a LONG way to go.

[Thank you to the 42 people who have contributed donations, and everyone who has bought books direct recently, you are all stars.]

How can you help?

Buy the book buy any of our books, actually, we don’t ringfence the income from them.

Or … (and?) donate! We will do as much BSL as we get money to cover.


 And tell anyone you know who you think would support this. Retweet, share on Facebook or wherever. This started out as an important, exciting, inventive project, and we’d really like to be able to recreate the buzz that the original idea came with.

What Meets the Eye? – The Writers’ Perspective

We talked to poets Colly Metcalfe and Emma Lee about what it means to be published in What Meets the Eye? and how both their works tackle perceptions of D/deafness and disability.

What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective

– What does having your work included in What Meets the Eye mean to you?

Emma: Firstly, I’m delighted to be alongside an impressive list of names. I’ve known Josephine Dickinson’s poems for a long time and I know Liam O’Dell’s work as a journalist but haven’t encountered his poems before. Raymond Antrobus’s preface is a generous consideration of identity and bias around being D/deaf and hard of hearing. Secondly, I’m really pleased at being included. I was nervous about submitting because I wasn’t sure if I was “deaf enough” to qualify – I can pass as hearing although was deaf as a young child and am hard of hearing now – and I’m unsure of where the boundary lies. In the event, I decided to submit because if I didn’t submit, there was no chance of acceptance. I shifted the responsibility for the decision to the editors and thought it was better to submit and get a rejection than find out afterwards my poem might have been accepted…but I still left it until the deadline.

Colly: I almost didn’t submit my poem!  I saw the call-out but I scrolled past, thinking it wasn’t for me.  I’ve only been writing for 3 years and I had no thoughts that my work would be even a smidge good enough to be published by Arachne Press, in a proper book!

I accidentally joined a (hearing) writing circle, but that too wasn’t easy to follow, but something ignited in me.  I read some of the women’s writings in the group and thought they were fabulous!  I was invited to some poetry reading events, but being deaf, they were completely inaccessible, and my confidence was shaken.  I had no ‘baseline’ to draw from; no peers to learn from about what works, what doesn’t and how to actually write.   

I was (still am!) pretty clueless when it comes to ‘proper writing’.  One of the local poets called my writing ‘childish and immature’, which could have really turned me off writing, but I’m not easily broken.  Maybe that comes from being deaf – thick skin and all that.  Then I took part in a fully accessible writing course for deaf, disabled and neurodivergent writers run by Spread The Word; the first time I’d been able to do something where I felt equal… and I did.  I didn’t know any of the people on the course, but it was led by the marvellous Jamie Hale and had people like DL Williams and Raymond Antrobous amongst so many others.  I wasn’t intimidated, because I didn’t know them, never having been in the writing arena. 

I think this is the reason I pressed the ‘submit’ button. Because other people believed in me, so I thought – why not? Nothing to lose! To have my poem Coffee Shop published in this anthology with such incredible people – and edited by Sophie Stone – is just inspiring!  I’m so proud that my words are in print!  For a new writer who is deaf and pretty much winging it, this is a huge buzz!  I mostly write for performance and I know what ‘looks good’ on a stage; I’m bold and fearless and happy to try things out, so seeing that my piece occupies a valid space in a book amongst other authors, is wonderful.

Colly Metcalfe

– Both of your poems address issues around the social definitions of deafness and disability. Why did you want to explore this in your work?

Colly: Because it comes easy to me.  It’s my lived experience and I could spend all day – all week – telling you sob stories and horror stories about how life is inaccessible (eg the poetry events I don’t go to, or the theatre performances I miss out on), but I don’t want to feel angry and frustrated all the time.  I spent years feeling like that, and hearing people stop caring after a while.  Writing poetry from a personal experience with some humour, gets the point across more effectively for me.  I use my voice a lot when performing live, and I inject BSL as a visual ‘accent’ and often with voice off, which really makes an audience see my point.  I’m told that because I use humour, it can ‘disarm’ an audience into thinking it’s fluffy and funny – but the honest twists of experience can make hearing people think about what it means to be deaf, and with deaf audiences, the shared experience makes us nod and agree because we’ve all been there.  I don’t always write about deafness, but there is often an element of ‘silence’ in my poetry, which alludes to the inability to hear.  I think with Coffee Shop, the references are very relatable for lots of deaf people.  I’ve written several pieces on ‘movement’, but this fit the brief and being an anthology of deaf writers, seemed appropriate.

Emma: My poem is about my journey into deafness, crossing the deaf/hard of hearing boundary and the difficulties created by having a largely invisible disability. At home alone, I don’t have to worry about how loud or quiet my voice is. I am in control of what background noise there is and my being hard of hearing doesn’t stop me doing anything that I want to do. However, in social circumstances, barriers are erected. Hearing people don’t think about background noise, someone knocking a glass on a hard floor is an annoyance rather than something that disrupts a conversation, why you might want to text rather than call, why it mattered that subtitles recently disappeared from TV channels, why it’s important that they are accurate, or why I ask how I sound after a poetry reading (and no one answers that question, except to say “you read well” or “you sounded OK” even though “well” and “OK” are not actual sounds).

don’t want all venues to be library-quiet, but I would like people to think about how noise travels and echoes in spaces and what might be done to accommodate those who can’t or struggle to hear. During the pandemic, when events moved online, it brought accessibility to event organisers’ attention and more effort was made to accommodate those with accessibility needs. I hope that continues as festivals and events open up again. There’s one venue in Leicester that gets it so wrong. When I have to go there, I go straight to the event without stopping for a coffee first, during the interval I do not leave to get a snack or drink and afterwards, I leave and walk to a nearby cafe bar for a drink because I cannot hear a conversation in the venue’s cafe and bar areas and the frequent interruptions from their tannoy (which I only hear as a muffled noise and have no idea what the attempted communication is about) make it difficult to focus to lip-read.

When it comes to equalities monitoring forms and the question “Do you have/consider yourself to have a disability?” I tend to tick “Prefer Not to Say” or “No” if that’s not an option. Especially if it’s part of an audience survey at an event which made zero accommodations for anyone hard of hearing. I don’t want to be responsible for the organisers thinking their event was accessible because they had a tick in their ‘disabled’ box. It’s not about every event having a BSL interpreter (although, in an ideal world, that would be good), but to encourage people to think about their audience and how organisers can meet the audience half-way, instead of expecting the audience to fit a venue that isn’t as accessible as it could be.

Emma Lee

– What do you think of each other’s approaches to these issues?

Emma: I love Colly’s humour and am jealous of people who can write humorously. I think it helps that the surly barrista is someone we’ve all met and we welcome the idea of her getting her comeuppance. A few finely-judged details not only set the scene but build characters so they’re not just cyphers. It’s a good way of holding up a mirror and asking: which character do you identify with? How would you handle the situation? Would you have intervened and forced the barrista to serve people in the queued order? Coffee Shop manages to be both light-hearted in tone and thought-provoking.

Colly: I related 100% to Emma’s piece. Her reference to the teacher saw me immediately sitting in the 1970s Maths classroom, and Mister Taylor who talked to the blackboard and threw chalk at me.  I never heard anything he said, and I didn’t know I was deaf then; I thought I was stupid…  Emma’s words brought all those feelings back, and I completely empathise with her experience.  I, too, struggled for a very long time with the ‘border between hard of hearing and deaf’.  ‘…hear in monotone’ – oh goodness yes.  I read Emma’s dialogue in this conversation too, about feeling that she’s not deaf enough and again, it hit me on a very personal level.  And that feeling of being in almost no-mans-land; neither hearing nor deaf.  I absolutely felt that.  For me, this is all in my past tense; I decided that I would not use the label ‘hard of hearing’ as I grew deafer, I became more comfortable with the word ‘deaf’.  It wasn’t easy; I speak well, I too can pass (bluff?) as a hearing person so the word ‘deaf’ took a long time to associate with, but it is right for me now.

– Is there anything that you would like to say to each other, after reading one another’s work?

Colly: I like your piece, Emma.  I’m glad (if that’s the right word?) that you felt deaf enough to submit your piece, because it’s certainly how younger me felt about becoming deafer.  I’d forgotten how difficult it was, and how far I’ve come in confidence as a deaf person. Your piece describes it perfectly, and I wish you well on your journey.  Your writing is clear and powerful and I’d really love to read more.  Thank you.

Emma: Please continue to write and share your writing. I think Colly’s background in theatre and performance is a good foundation and her ability to create characters from a clutch of telling details and capture conversation in print will take her far.

– How do you think your own poem sits within the wider collection of work in What Meets the Eye?

Emma: The strength in What Meets the Eye is its diversity of experiences, it touches on the barriers D/deaf and hard of hearing people face, on politics, emotions, prejudice, navigating a hearing world, being part of a family, and it also that there is no one definitive definition of deafness. The voices are various because they belong to people who still have a desire to communicate and be more than just a label. My poem is, rightly so, just my experience.

Colly: I think Coffee Shop sits well as a ‘diary-style-funny-we’ve-all-been-here-and-felt-that-moment’ poem, amongst the incredibly personal and touching words.  I write in a relatable way, and Coffee Shop reads like a good ‘lift’ amongst the beautiful, thoughtful and rich pieces.  I don’t know what I expected, and I don’t know how I thought I’d feel seeing Coffee Shop with other works, but I’m very proud and happy with the placing of it in the pages, and how the very different styles gel as an anthology – because of their very diverse approaches.  A huge success, I feel – and I’m very humbled to be there with these talented deaf writers.  

What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is available now. Order your copy from our online shop.

Publication day! and Update 3: Funding for BSL Project 19-11-21

Publication day for our Deaf, deaf and Hard of Hearing writers anthology, What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is here!

Congratulations to all our authors and poets.

Books should be available in bookshops from now. Our distributor has plenty and any bookshop that doesn’t have it in stock should be able to get it within 24-48 hours. Though, obviously, we’d much prefer you to buy direct.

This is an exciting project and we had planned to make the entire book available as BSL videos for free.

What Meets the Eye?

It has proved FAR more complicated and expensive than we first thought, and our budget of £4k [provided by ACE] has proved hopelessly inadequate, despite being based on actual costs for other BSL translation work. We are doing our best to achieve what we set out to do, but it’s a hand to mouth existance, being a small independant publisher – we don’t have assets or savings or a head office to bail us out. We need help urgently.

We told our mailing list about the problem last month, and have been tweeting regularly, and posting here – With book sales added to to the total we have now raised £1193.

[Thank you to the 41 people who have contributed donations, and everyone who has bought books direct recently, you are all stars.]

However we need £2,500 to get close to the ever increasing costs, so this is about half what we need.

 

 

 

 

We have started posting the videos we already have here, some are already captioned, some will have to wait for more funds, but we thought better to have them without captions for now, than not share them at all.

How can you help?

Buy the book buy any of our books, actually, we don’t ringfence the income from them.

Or … (and?) donate! We will do as much BSL as we get money to cover.


 And tell anyone you know who you think would support this. Retweet, share on Facebook or wherever. This started out as an important, exciting, inventive project, and we’d really like to be able to recreate the buzz that the original idea came with.

Update 2: Funding for BSL Project 19-11-21

Publication day for our Deaf, deaf and Hard of Hearing writers anthology, What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is next week!

This is an exciting project and we had planned to make the entire book available as BSL videos for free.

What Meets the Eye?

It has proved FAR more complicated and expensive than we first thought, and our budget of £4k [provided by ACE] has proved hopelessly inadequate, despite being based on actual costs for other BSL translation work. We are doing our best to achieve what we set out to do, but it’s a hand to mouth existance, being a small independant publisher – we don’t have assets or savings or a head office to bail us out. We need help urgently.

We told our mailing list about the problem last month, and have been tweeting regularly, and posting here – With book sales added to to the total we have now raised £1078.

[Thank you to the 40 people who have contributed donations, you are all stars.]

However we need £2,500 to get close to the ever increasing costs.

 

 

 

 

How can you help?

Buy the book buy any of our books, actually, we don’t ringfence the income from them.

Or … (and?) donate! We will do as much BSL as we get money to cover.


 And tell anyone you know who you think would support this. Retweet, share on Facebook or wherever. This started out as an important, exciting, inventive project, and we’d really like to be able to recreate the buzz that the original idea came with.

There’s some complex number crunching going on, and we will start posting the videos we already have Tomorrow… they will be here

In the meantime we have some really tricky poems, a preface and a long short story that all our translator contacts have passed on as ‘too difficult’ so, if you are a BSL translator, please get in touch!

 

 

Update: Funding for BSL Project

Publication day for our Deaf, deaf and Hard of Hearing writers anthology, What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is approaching fast. This is an exciting project and we had planned to make the entire book available as BSL videos for free.

What Meets the Eye?

It has proved FAR more complicated and expensive than we first thought, and our budget of £4k [provided by ACE] has proved hopelessly inadequate, despite being based on actual costs for other BSL translation work. We are doing our best to achieve what we set out to do, but it’s a hand to mouth existance, being a small independant publiser – we don’t have assets or savings or a head office to bail us out. We have found a great many dead ends in search of other funding, and we need help urgently.

We told our mailing list about the problem last month, and have been tweeting regularly, and between them that has raised just over £850. However we need £2,500 to get close to the ever increasing costs. We’ve reluctantly cancelled the launch, which even on line, would have been quite expensive, with all the access requirements,  which will help a bit.

As a result of an earlier post here, today we are now at just under £1000

[Thank you to the 39 people who have contributed, you are all stars.]

 

 

 

 

How can you help?

Buy the book buy any of our books, actually, we don’t ringfence the income from them. There has been a flurry of book buying this week, which I haven’t calculated yet, but this will also help.

Or … (and?) donate! We will do as much BSL as we get money to cover.


 And tell anyone you know who you think would support this. Retweet, share on Facebook or wherever. This started out as an important, exciting, inventive project, and we’d really like to be able to recreate the buzz that the original idea came with.

There’s some complex number crunching going on, and we will start posting the videos we already have very soon…

In the meantime we have some really tricky poems, a preface and a long short story that all our translator contacts have passed on as ‘too difficult’ so, if you are a BSL translator, please get in touch!

 

 

Progress on Funding for BSL Project

Publication day for our Deaf, deaf and Hard of Hearing writers anthology, What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective is approaching fast. This is an exciting project and we had planned to make the entire book available as BSL videos for free.

What Meets the Eye?

It has proved FAR more complicated and expensive than we first thought, and our budget of £4k [provided by ACE] has proved hopelessly inadequate, despite being based on actual costs for other BSL translation work. We are doing our best to achieve what we set out to do, but it’s a hand to mouth existance, being a small independant publiser – we don’t have assets or savings or a head office to bail us out. We have found a great many dead ends in search of other funding, and we need help urgently.

We told our mailing list about the problem last month, and have been tweeting regularly, and between them that has raised just over £850. [Thank you to the 37 people who have contributed, you are all stars.] However we need £2,500 to get close to the ever increasing costs. We’ve reluctantly cancelled the launch, which even on line, would have been quite expensive, with all the access requirements,  which will help a bit.

We’ve been looking (rather wanly) for a jazzy animated graphic to display progress, but to be honest, it’s hard to find much enthusiasm for making this ‘fun’, or taking time away from beating heads on brick funding walls.

Here’s what we’ve come up with so far.

As you can see, about a 1/3 of the way there.

Normally at this time of year we are crowdfunding for Solstice Shorts, and we just don’t feel able to do that this year – its too  confusing a message to be raising cash for two different projects – so this is impacting other projects as well. More on our solution to the Solstice conundrum in another post.

How can you help?

Buy the book buy any of our books, actually, we don’t ringfence the income from them.

Or … (and?) donate! We will do as much BSL as we get money to cover.


 And tell anyone you know who you think would support this. Retweet, share on Facebook or wherever. This started out as an important, exciting, inventive project, and it’s really depressing that its ended up where it has.

 

 

Mapping the path to safety

To begin our Where We Find Ourselves blog tour, Arachne Press Director, Cherry Potts shares her thoughts on the theme of ‘Maps and Mapping’:

Maps are objects of pleasure and anticipation for me, promises of holidays and beautiful in their own right, but they used to be safety blankets – I went through a long period of agoraphobia and the only way I could take a ‘stroll’ in the countryside (or anywhere else, really) was if I knew exactly where I was going, what obstacles were along the way and how long it would take – getting lost was something I literally had nightmares about. I’m better at it now, but it’s always me with the map in my pocket, if no longer clutched in an anxious grip.

So when Laila Sumpton suggested ‘Maps and Mapping’ as the focus for our global majority anthology, Where We Find Ourselves, I said yes almost by reflex. As we settled into thinking about why, exactly, we thought this a good idea, there was a lot to cover. Arachne has a history with what is apparently called Psychogeography – not planned, but one of our books is on the reading list at a university, so I’m told – these were geographically rooted (routed?) books of stories set in London, and along the east London Overground. I like that sort of thing. But this was different. We didn’t want to over-dictate what our authors wrote about, and wanted to see what would come up. We were hoping  for stories of home, belonging, leaving, journeys, identity, borders, invasion, exile … not of a particular place, but any place that the author or poet felt strongly about. And we got them, especially the search for places of safety – and we got a story about getting lost on a country walk, so that was my personal nightmare ticked off too.

Somehow this map idea morphed into an almost series. Not quite enough of one to say book one of… (although if pushed I will!) but four (so far) conceptually linked books.

Next up, in November, is What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective, an anthology of  poems and stories from Deaf, deaf and Hard of Hearing writers.

About twelve years ago I studied Neurolinguistic Programming (one of the things that helped overcome my agoraphobia). One of the basic tenets of NLP is that people have a linguistic preference that reveals how they experience the world, showing itself in use of words to do with one specific sense. Most people are visual or kinaesthetic (touch, motion, emotion), far fewer auditory, etc; although the transmit preference may not be the same as the receive preference. I spent some time wondering if I dare stick my hand up and say what about people who don’t have access to all those things? I never did, I found the large group intimidating, but I spent a lot of time thinking about it. When I started learning BSL, my doubts were confirmed, and confounded as well. So when I was discussing the title of a book with movement as its theme (very loose connection to maps!) with editors Lisa Kelly and Sophie Stone, I was on about the language of movement or the movement of language, and Sophie entirely disagreed and said that BSL is a language of sight. In my kinaesthetically orientated way I had been thinking about transmitting communication and Sophie was thinking about receiving it. Which is how we ended up with the title What Meets the Eye? The Deaf Perspective.

Alongside these two anthologies I had been talking to Ness Owen and Sian Northey about a bilingual Welsh-English poetry anthology for March next year. Sian came up with the brilliant idea of poems about/inspired by the iconic north-south route, the A470. Disclosure – my Welsh is limited to what can generally be found on a road sign, and saying hello and thank you, so an appropriate theme for me! Out came my maps – of course – and yes, I had driven bits of that road.

We won’t have to translate the title, Sian said. Wrong – because we’ve ended up with a subtitle, Poems for the Road/Cerrdi’r Ffordd.

Nothing screams maps more than a book about a road, and I spent a lot of time looking up places referenced in the poems, and getting to understand the topography of both road and poems. I can’t wait to drive it again, boring my wife silly as I point out places and say oh that’s in so-and-so’s poem. We have a fantasy about hiring a bus to do a book tour along the length of the road from Cardiff to Llandudno. The irony of this, in light of the next book, is not lost on me.

Before we get to the A470, we have another book – the Solstice Shorts Festival anthology, Words from the Brink out in December in time for the festival. Our initial call out had the loose concept of time is running out, and we wanted work that addressed the climate crisis.

At risk of sounding like a spare part from Dr Who, Solstice Shorts is always about time, and the festival has travelled around most of the UK, and even got to Portugal one year, so I thought we ought to be able to get a map theme into our overarching time concept. This year’s festival itself is still very much up in the air at the moment. Venues are difficult, and should we really be trying to have an in-real-life event at all?

Perhaps the link to maps is tenuous, except, actually, it isn’t. This book encompasses the whole Earth – viewed from space by acquisitive or curious aliens, in her personification as Gaia and in the microcosm of a single plant or butterfly. Our authors map their way through climate crisis to disaster, or renewal.

We are on the brink. A gnat’s wink in either direction can make the difference. Which direction  will we take?

You can follow the blog tour for Where We Find Ourselves until 30 October.