Norwich Radical, Review of The Significance of a Dress

A new review of Emma Lee‘s The Significance of a Dress from Carmina Masoliver on Norwich Radical

Lee’s strength is in the moments of clear imagery and engagement of the senses

read more here:

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF A DRESS BY EMMA LEE – REVIEW

Author Guest Blog: Emma Lee – Significant Dresses

The title poem from my Arachne Press collection, The Significance of a Dress, is set in a wedding hire shop in a refugee camp in Iraq. People can be left in limbo, unable to return to the country they’ve left, and not yet able to integrate into the country they’ve applied for asylum in. Processing applications is rarely a priority and people can find themselves in camps for years, decades even. The camps’ residents are mostly young men. One reason is that they don’t have caring responsibilities so it’s easier for them to travel alone and they’re often sent on ahead, with other relatives planning to join them once they’ve settled. Another reason is that they are at risk of being conscripted either into the armed forces or into rebel militia. While girls don’t generally have that concern, girls do have to find ways of coping with sexual harassment and finding protection. In the camps, refugees are still expected to pay for food and utilities. Women can find themselves thrust into finding ways of becoming a family’s main breadwinner. No doubt some marriages are love matches, but others are about buying protection or settling dowries. Whatever the motivation behind the marriage, “a bride still wants to feel special, at least for one day.” When “The future is tomorrow. Next year is a question./ A wedding is a party, a sign of hope.”

In most cultures, a bride-to-be is made to feel that a wedding dress is the most significant choice she has. It may be an heirloom dress, worn by a mother or grandmother. It may be a dress of her choosing that incorporates memories of family members who can no longer attend the wedding, whether a sash in a late relative’s favourite colour, a borrowed pair of shoes, or a favourite flower in the bride’s bouquet. Some women have been planning their dress long before there was a groom. Whether the bride is looking for an extravagant ballgown or a slinky sheath for a beach wedding, or a trouser suit, it’s also likely to be the most expensive dress she’ll buy. Most brides will plan to shop with close friends or relatives, with the expectation of being put centre stage with a wide choice to try on. Where do you find a wedding dress if you’re stuck in a camp, possibly with restrictions on where you can travel and shop, and still under cultural pressure to make your day significant?

In one camp a woman, who’d worked in the fashion industry, set up a wedding hire shop to earn for her family. The title poem is based on an interview with her. The dresses were original brought in via her former fashion industry contacts, but she also uses seamstresses based in the camp to repair and alter gowns. A team of beauticians offer hair and make-up styling that won’t melt in the desert heat and will stay in place in the humid evenings so that the bride can have her big day. There is a risk some of the brides are underage, and the staff in the shop never ask the bride-to-be how old she is. A small group of women can’t police a camp, and they understand the desperation of a family.

My poem Casting a Daughter Adrift (from Time and Tide), looks at a wedding from a mother’s viewpoint. This mother has turned to needlework to earn money to feed the family, but it aware she can’t offer much protection against the harassment in the camps, “This man I have agreed to/ in her father’s absence/ I hope will protect her.” The journey from what was hope to the camp has aged her, “The shop’s cracked, foxed mirror/ tells me I’m decades older than my bones.” Neither of them can go back, “The house she was born in is rubble”. Yet she still wants this day to be special for her daughter, “The final payment is the last of my savings/ but I have one less mouth to feed.” Despite her desperation, she is proud of her daughter, “I’m going to let her go,/ my desert flower will bloom.”

Whatever your feelings on marriage, whether you want to get married or not, it’s hard to resist the idea of a wedding as a celebration and a note of hope amongst people whose lives have been devastated by war.

Emma Lee is a regular contributor to our anthologies, and her collection The Significance of a Dress, really fell foul of the Corona virus, with multiple events cancelled, and one of the launches delayed and venue moved. Instead of moping (which must have been tempting) Emma has been very generous with her time, writing this blog and contributing interviews to the website.

You can buy all the books mentioned from our webshop, we will post them out to you.

Preorder No Spider Harmed…  (Another anthology with a poem by Emma in it) out 8th August for our eighth anniversary.

If you would prefer eBooks, all these books are available from your usual retailer, now VAT free! We recommend Hive for ePub.

 

Poetry goes Eeeeee

ALL our poetry books are now available as eBooks!

With the booktrade suffering, we wanted to make it as easy for you to get lovely things to read as possible, so we have worked very hard to get these in the vitual shops for you. Thanks to Inpress for organising conversions and uploading!

Find these gorgeous words as Kindles on Amazon

and ePub on Hive

In case you were wondering, all our fiction is already available as ebooks. We aren’t set up to sell them ourselves, yet. Working on it.

Anthologies The Other Side of Sleep, and Vindication: poems from six women poets

With Paper for Feet Jennifer A McGowan

A Gift of Rivers, and The Don’t Touch Garden, Kate Foley

Foraging , Joy Howard

Erratics, Cathy Bryant

In Retail, Jeremy Dixon

The Knotsman, Math Jones

Mamiaith, Ness Owen

Let out the Djinn, Jane Aldous

The Significance of a Dress, Emma Lee.

 

Emma Lee IWD video The Significance of a Dress

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is The Significance of a Dress. We have one more poem to post… in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video Standing on Ice

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Standing on Ice. We have a couple more poems to post… in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video Casting a Daughter Adrift

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Casting a Daughter Adrift, which is actually in Time and Tide.

You can buy Time and Tide in two different editions from us, the standard one, available in the shops (from 21st March) or the illustrated limited edition.

We will be doing a VIRTUAL launch on 21st March from 2pm, with live readings from Neil Lawrence, Elizabeth Parker, Elizabeth Hopkinson, Claire Booker, Ness Owen, and CB Droege, and pre-recorded segments from Emily Bullock and Laura Potts via our Facebook page, as we think it wise not to encourage people to congregate, but still want to celebrate our lovely book! We hope to just delay our event at Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, but we’ll see how it goes!

Emma Lee IWD video I Saw Lifejackets on the Beach

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is I Saw Lifejackets on the Beach. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video How Rapunzel Ends

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is How Rapunzel Ends. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video Diary from Holloway Gaol

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Diary from Holloway Gaol. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video Outside the Photograph

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Outside the Photograph. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!