#Arachne5 Party: videos for Stations

We had so much fun at the party on Friday. The quality of the live video (find it on Facebook) is a bit ropey so here is some better quality!

Here are Summer All Year Long singing the song from the original launch party for Stations, Sweet Train Roll Softly based on (the much better) Sweet Thames Roll Softly, by Ewan MacColl. We had a different arrangement originally, by Peter Morgan, but an almost entirely different choir membership and very little rehearsal, so this is Melanie Harrold‘s arrangement (more or less) which we learnt more recently.

And Bartle Sawbridge reading the middle section of Rich and Strange, the story he wrote for the Shadwell stop on the journey the anthology takes from Highbury and Islington to West Croydon.

As part of our 5th anniversary celebrations Stations is available for a bargain £5 from our web shop.

We are crowdfunding for Solstice Shorts Festival 2017 DUSK. help us reach our target!

 

 

Stations reviewed by Sabotage

Well this is exciting. After the brilliant review from Sabotage earlier this week for Lovers’ Lies, we have a review for Stations as well.

Highlights:

Carol[ine] Hardman’s ‘Bloody Marys and a bowl of Pho’ (Hoxton) is a modern-day, urban take on the vampire narratives so current at the moment. It is well-written and funny. ‘Platform Zero’ (Haggerston) by Michael Zimmer [Trimmer] also offers a quirky version of another, familiar theme – that of the parallel universe. ‘The Beetle’ by Ellie Stewart (Wapping) is also well-paced and moving in its portrayal of a broken relationship. Peter Morgan’s ‘Mr Forest Hill Station’ (Forest Hill) also stands out due to its tender depiction of the bond between strangers, meeting occasionally in the big city.

 

A common theme the stories share is the sense of locale; all stories give a real sense of London’s enclaves, those small areas threaded together by transport links. In some stories the topography is described in minute detail: ‘ ‘Left out of the station entrance,’ she had said, ‘not far until a sort-of-small-road-kind-of-more-like-an-alley which you need to go down all the way, then through the gap-between-the-shops to cross the big street, then to the right for a bit until you get to a shop with a kind-of-old-fashioned-green-sign and some little writing in the window […].’ (‘Three Things to Do in Surrey Quays’, Adrian Gantlope). It is enlightening to the non-London resident to think of London in such small terms, as described above.

Many stories also focus upon the fragility and fleetingness of relationships. For example, Rob Walton describes an odd kind of love affair in ‘Yellow Tulips’ (New Cross Gate), between the narrator, and John and Alex. The affair itself seems unsatisfactory and temporary, based on hurried meetings. Walton is effective at capturing the instability of the relationship: ‘It is possible to live in a city, a town, a village, an area of a city for a short time and make new friends, close friends, have altogether deeper relationships. Without the shared past or common references you can dive into the here and now, establish a new sort of relationship, one you haven’t tried before. Do all the things you didn’t do in the other places you lived. Then move on and become a new you, or be one of the other yous [sic] in another new place.’

Thank you Sabotage!

Writing Ambitions – three days to go on Kickstarter funding bid

Just thought I’d mention, its three days almost exactly until time runs out on our funding bid. If you’d like to support us, please take a look at the pitch – you can have a laugh at me and Katy being distracted by every butterfly that flew past, and remaining oblivious of the trains roaring by at the bottom of the garden – one of the few decent patches of sun so far this ‘Summer’, a bit like today.

And in the meantime, watch a whole bunch of Arachne authors talk about their writing ambitions…

© Arachne Press 2013

Arachne Authors talk about writing habits 2

Paula Read and Jacqueline Downs like to be in motion

Emily Cleaver writes when her child is asleep

Wendy Gill would like a greenhouse!

Lennart Lundh loves his computer, Michelle Shine loves her writing group

more arachne authors on the writers who inspire and influence them

Stations and London Lies contributors tell us about the writers they admire

Wendy Gill, Michael Trimmer, Ellie Stewart, Emily Cleaver

Peter Morgan and Jacqueline Downs

Forest Hill Library Cityread – the video

A well attended event, about a dozen enthusiastic folk, only one of whom we already knew! thank you to Alan and Paolo for their excellent marketing.

Appropriately for a Forest Hill gig, we started the evening with Peter Morgan’s Mr Forest Hill Station, about an eccentric and seemingly eternally youthful man only ever seen in the station’s environs.

Moving one stop north we encountered Rosalind Stopps’ story of aging romantic angst in How to Grow Old in Brockley.

Over (or should it be under) the river we stopped off at Shoreditch for Katy Darby’s drug-and-ego fuelled tale of Bafta wannabe’s The Horror, the Horror.

And our furthest point north, Hoxton brought us Caroline Hardman’s story of a vampire completely out of his depth.

Going Overground with Cityread

Cityread London (1)As part of CityRead Arachne Press authors will be reading from Stations at

Forest Hill Library
Dartmouth Road SE23 3HZ
on Thursday 18th April 2013 7-8.30pm

Rosalind Stopps (Brockley), Caroline Hardman (Hoxton), Jacqueline Downs (Crystal Palace) and Peter Morgan (Forest Hill) for stories of love among the coffee cups, vampires in pubs, ghosts in the machine and eccentrics at a station.

cityread forest hill001

Arachne Press Authors talk about what they did before they met us

Of course we’d like to think the most significant relationship our authors have is with us as their publisher, but they do have histories…

find out what they got up to – in their writing,

Photos from Hills & Parkes reading and London Transport Museum Signing

Paula Read at Hills & Parkes

Paula Read at Hills & Parkes

Hills & Parkes the deli in Honor Oak Park hosted us a reading in December, which was a very quiet affair, but they made us fantastic carrot cake to go with Paula Read‘s Honor Oak Park story, Carrot Cake. We like to feed our audience’s imagination through as many senses as possible!

Bartle Sawbridge at Hills & Parkes

Bartle Sawbridge at Hills & Parkes

Peter Morgan at Hills & Parkes

Peter Morgan at Hills & Parkes

Jacqueline Downs at the London Transport Museum

Jacqueline Downs braves the cold at the London Transport Museum

We followed this up with a signing session at the London Transport Museum shop, where they were very enthusiastic and we discovered that Wendy Gill has a talent for selling that the rest of us can’t emulate.  We were getting a certain amount of recognition for the book because of the cover –  which is by Gail Brodholt – one of her pictures was on the wall, and lots of her cards around the place too.Our signing table was right by

Katy Darby, Paula Read and Peter Morgan at London Transport Museum

Katy Darby, Paula Read and Peter Morgan at London Transport Museum

the door, so we were in a bitter gale most of the time, but a lovely American tourist gave Paula and me some little hand warmer things that helped considerably, and the staff took us off to defrost in their staffroom.

Anyway we signed all the stock so if you are looking for a signed copy ofStations or London Lies, London Transport Museum

Wendy Gill (Saleswoman of the day), Bartle Sawbridge, Caroline Hardman at London Transport Museum, with Paula pretending to be crowd.

Wendy Gill (Saleswoman of the day), Bartle Sawbridge, Caroline Hardman at London Transport Museum, with Paula pretending to be crowd.

would be a good place to try (though not apparently their on line shop)!

Canvas & Cream reading videos

Rather delayed, but here are some videos from the Canvas & Cream reading – featuring the work of Peter Morgan, Paula Read, Andrew Blackman (read by Cherry Potts), Joan Taylor-Rowan and Jacqueline Downs