Arachne recommends books for International Women’s Day

Authors and Editors of upcoming titles choose three books  each that they would recommend for International Women’s Day

(Links mainly to our Bookshop affiliate page, except where the book is out of print, where the link will take you to abebooks, or not yet available where the link will take you to the publishers site)

Clare Owen, author of Zed and the Cormorants (April 2021)

The Good Women of China – Xinran

True – often harrowing and heartbreaking – stories of women living during the Cultural Revolution, collected by the host of a Chinese radio call-in show.

Love Among the Butterflies: The Travels and Adventures of a Victorian Lady – Margaret Fountaine (out of print)

The private diaries of a vicar’s daughter who defied her family’s expectations to travel the world collecting butterflies and lovers along the way.

What I Loved – Siri Hustvedt

A beautifully written, intense and intelligent book about art, love and loss from a writer who invariably gets less attention than her husband (novelist Paul Auster)!

Cherry Potts, Arachne Editor in Chief (who gets to choose more than three)

The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula le Guin

A powerful and wildly original Science Fiction novel that tackles gender fluidity decades before anyone else, in passionate and often witty observations of human, and alien frailty.

The White Darkness, Geraldine McCaughrean

I could have picked any of McCaughrean’s young adult novels, but this is the one I read first and adored. A tautly written adventure that doesn’t sidestep difficulties, and is truly shocking at times.

Persepolis Marjane Satrapi

A graphic novel/autobiography about growing up as a stroppy teenager in Iran. Funny, distressing and beautiful.

Second Class Citizen Buchi Emecheta

As a bright young thing in the 70’s and early 80’s, I sought out and read acres of books by black women, many of them American, and some no longer in print. This book bucked the trend, being both British and with sufficient enduring appeal to still be available. There are whole passages in this book I remember pretty much verbatim nearly 50 years later.

The Stone Age Jen Hadfield

Not actually out yet, (18th March) this is my first ‘choice’ selection from the Poetry Book Society. I’d been resisting signing up on the grounds that I like to choose my own books, and poverty, but I finally cracked and I’m really glad I did. This is one of those ‘I wish I’d published that’ books, and taps into all sorts of things that I love, in particular the standing stones of Shetland. Hadfield gives them voice in an entirely convincing way. A total delight that made me want to visit Shetland again.

Ness Owen, co-editor A470 (March 2022)

Inhale/Exile Abeer Ameer  (Seren). The poems I’ve heard so far are a fascinating mix of the personal and political, of language and place. Between Iraq and Britain, the poems move from tender family histories to shocking atrocities.

Flashbacks and Flowers Rufus Mufasa (Indigo Dreams forthcoming, can’t find any information though!) I really enjoyed the journey in this collection deeply rooted in time, place and lives lived with a wonderful interweaving of languages.

Aubade After a French Movie Zoe Brigley (Broken Sleep Books)  This pamphlet includes some of the wonderful Gwerful Mechain’s poetry, bringing it into the 21st century (including an interpretation of the infamous Ode to a C*** in a brave modern voice). The poems are a spoken celebration for what it is to be a women without shame.

Laura Besley, Author of 100nehundred (May 2021)

Mrs Narwhal’s Diary by S.J. Norbury (publisher Louise Walters Books). I heard the author read an exert of Mrs Narwhal’s Diary at an LWB event and completely fell in love with the style of the book and the main character’s unique voice.

The Thin Line Between Everything and Nothing by Hannah Storm (Reflex Press). Hannah Storm’s flash fiction is searing in its honesty, attention to detail and emotional resonance. This collection will, without a doubt, be fantastic.

The Yet Unknowing World by Fiona J. Mackintosh (Adhoc Fiction). Fiona J. Mackintosh’s writing is a sublime combination of lyrical and startling. I’m very much looking forward to reading her full collection.

Lily Peters, author of Accidental Flowers

The Hazelnut Grove, by Paula Read: [Disclosure: Paula is Lily’s mum, and we’ve published her in the past.] I might be slightly biased, so don’t just take my reviews for it. If you want to escape for a while into the European dream and in turn, discover the harsh reality of how much work it takes to make such a dream come true, this is a satisfying and comforting read.

The Bass Rock, by Evie Wyld: This is the story of three women, in some way related, across three time periods. It is set by the wild North Sea in the Scottish borders and the landscape is a character in its own right. It is unsettlingly written, and it has everything you need: scandal, spooky empty houses and a hint of witchcraft.

Weather, by Jenny Offill: The way Offill writes is gripping and quick. It is the closest thing you can get to instant gratification in literature. This book is all about the relatively unknown under-world of ‘preppers’ – those who are preparing for a potential world-ending apocalypse. Right up my ever-darkening street!

IWD video Cherry Potts

 

On 8th March we held an International Women’s Day of readings from female authors and poets, surrounded by the  Tatty Divine exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Gallleries for hosting.

Here is Cherry Potts reading her short story from Departures, Cloud Island.

 

Emma Lee IWD video The Significance of a Dress

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is The Significance of a Dress. We have one more poem to post… in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

Emma Lee IWD video Standing on Ice

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Standing on Ice. We have a couple more poems to post… in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

IWD video Shamini Sriskandarajah

 

On 8th March we held an International Women’s Day of readings from female authors and poets, surrounded by the  Tatty Divine exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Gallleries for hosting.

Here is Shamini Sriskandarajah reading her flash from Story Cities, Coffee.

 

Emma Lee IWD video Casting a Daughter Adrift

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is Casting a Daughter Adrift, which is actually in Time and Tide.

You can buy Time and Tide in two different editions from us, the standard one, available in the shops (from 21st March) or the illustrated limited edition.

We will be doing a VIRTUAL launch on 21st March from 2pm, with live readings from Neil Lawrence, Elizabeth Parker, Elizabeth Hopkinson, Claire Booker, Ness Owen, and CB Droege, and pre-recorded segments from Emily Bullock and Laura Potts via our Facebook page, as we think it wise not to encourage people to congregate, but still want to celebrate our lovely book! We hope to just delay our event at Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, but we’ll see how it goes!

IWD video Sarah Lawson

 

On 8th March we held an International Women’s Day of readings from female authors and poets, surrounded by the  Tatty Divine exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Gallleries for hosting.

Here is Sarah Lawson reading her two poems from Vindication, Driving up to Renfrew and Going Home in Fog.

 

Emma Lee IWD video I Saw Lifejackets on the Beach

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is I Saw Lifejackets on the Beach. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!

IWD video Michelle Penn

On 8th March we held an International Women’s Day of readings from female authors and poets, surrounded by the  Tatty Divine exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Gallleries for hosting.

 

Here is Michelle Penn reading her poem from Dusk, The End of Ramadan, and from Time and Tide, The Sinking of Mrs Margaret Brown

You can buy Time and Tide in two different editions from us, the standard one, available in the shops (from 21st March) or theillustrated limited edition.

We will be doing a VIRTUAL launch on 21st March, via our Facebook page, as we think it wise not to encourage people to congregate, but still want to celebrate our lovely book! We hope to just delay our event at Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, but we’ll see how it goes!

 

Emma Lee IWD video How Rapunzel Ends

On International Women’s Day we launched Emma Lee‘s new collection, The Significance of a Dress, at Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Many thanks to Greenwich University Galleries for hosting!

This is How Rapunzel Ends. We will be posting a poem a day for a little while in the hope of enticing you to buy this lovely, hair-raising collection!