A Voice Coming from Then On Tour

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This Autumn we’re taking A Voice Coming from Then on tour in Wales, to celebrate the collection winning the English Language Poetry Category in the 2022 Wales Book of the Year Awards. Join us at one of the events below for readings and conversation with poet Jeremy Dixon (and occasional guests).

Links to tickets for all the events will be updated as they become available.

COMING UP

29/11/2022 Typewronger, Edinburgh details
30/11/2022 Lighthouse Books, Edinburgh details

If you would like any more information about any of these events, please contact outreach@arachnepress.com.

CATCH VIDEOS HERE SOON FOR EVENTS THAT HAVE ALREADY HAPPENED

IN THE MEANTIME HERE’S A TASTER

05/10/2022 The Hours, Brecon
06/10/2022 (National Poetry Day)  Waterstones, Carmarthen
06/10/2022 (National Poetry Day)Waterstones, Cardiff
13/10/2022 Cardiff Central Library Hub, joint event with George Sandifer-Smith

All the events above are free.

 

A Voice Coming From Then shortlisted for Wales Book of the Year!

We couldn’t be more excited to share the news that A Voice Coming From Then by Jeremy Dixon is on the shortlist (of three!) for the 2022 English-language Wales Book of the Year, in the Poetry category.

We are celebrating by holding an online event with the other shortlisted poets, Angela Gardner and Abeer Ameer, on 20th July at 7pm. Get your free ticket here.

A Voice Coming From Then, which we published in August 2021, starts with poet Jeremy Dixon’s teenage suicide attempt and expands to encompass themes of bullying, queerphobia, acceptance and support.

As well as exploring identity, the tragic effects of bullying and the impact of suicide, this collection also includes unexpected typography, collage, humour, magic, discotheques and frequent appearances from the Victorian demon, Spring-heeled Jack.

 

Jeremy Dixon said: “I am beyond delighted that my collection of poems dealing with bullying, queerphobia and attempted suicide has made the shortlist of Wales Book of the Year 2022. My greatest hope throughout the difficult writing process was that the book would be understood and resonate with an audience beyond myself. For the book to have been selected by the judges is the most unexpected and welcome compliment!”

‘beyond delighted…’

The Wales Book of the Year Award is an annual prize celebrating outstanding literary talent from Wales across many genres and in both English and Welsh. Today, Friday 1 July, Literature Wales announced which books have reached the English-language Wales Book of the Year Short List 2022.

YOU can VOTE for the people’s choice from the shortlist via Wales Art Review

The winners will be announced on BBC Radio Wales on 29 July.

Congratulations Jeremy!  We are so pleased A Voice Coming From Then is getting the attention it deserves.

You can order a copy of A Voice Coming From Then from our webshop. To celebrate Jeremy’s place on the shortlist, we’ll send you a code for 50% off either the ebook or audiobook, when you order a print copy.

Any press enquiries, please email Saira Aspinall on outreach@arachnepress.com.

Mamiaith Book Launch videos part 4

Final videos of the launch of Mamiaith by Ness Owen, held at Canolfan Ucheldre in Holyhead.

Ness reads a pair of political poems in her second set – a bit of history, and a brilliant metaphor for the silencing of women, in Welsh and English.

and some of the musical interlude from Caine and ‘Caine’s dad’-

 

 

You can buy Mamiaith direct from our webshop or ask your local bookshop to stock it!

Caine and Aled Jones-Williams perform Titrwm Tatrwm, an ancient Ynys Môn folk song.

 

Mamiaith Book Launch videos part 3

Videos of the launch of Mamiaith by Ness Owen, held at Canolfan Ucheldre in Holyhead.

Ness reads a couple of more personal poems in her second set – her grandmother cooking, and her auntie’s feet!

 

You can buy Mamiaith direct from our webshop or ask your local bookshop to stock it!

Mamiaith Book Launch videos part 2

Videos of the launch of Mamiaith by Ness Owen, held at Canolfan Ucheldre in Holyhead.

This is where Ness’s friends got involved, reading some of the poems on Ness’s behalf…

Karen Ankers and Eabhan Ni Shuileabhain read #10 ways to say No (to Radioactive Mud)

 

Fiona Owen reads Laboon

 

Eabhan Ni Shuileabhain reads March

 

Anne Phillips reads One Name – Cymru

many thanks to all for getting involved.

You can buy Mamiaith direct from our webshop or ask your local bookshop to stock it!

Mamiaith Launch videos – Part 1

First of the videos from the launch of Mamiaith at Canolfan Ucheldre in Holyhead.

On the night the Eisteddfod packed up early because the weather was so bad, the hardy folk of Ynys Môn shrugged on their coats, and very possibly sou’westers and wellies, and came out to celebrate Ness Owen’s lovely book.

I don’t normally include my wittering on in the videos, but there were some important things to report in this introduction, so it’s included.

 

And here’s author Ness Owen reading her title poem, Mamiaith.

 

 

Happy Saint David’s Day /Dydd Gŵyl Dewi

It’s St David’s Day, so let’s celebrate our Welsh/Wales-based writers

Jeremy Dixon (In Retail, Liberty Tales, The Other Side of Sleep)

Nicholas McGaughey (Dusk, An Outbreak of Peace, Noon, Story Cities)

Karen Ankers (Noon)

Gareth Culshaw (Noon)

Diana Powell (Noon)

Ness Owen (Mamiaith, An Outbreak of Peace, Noon, Dusk, Shortest Day Longest Night)

We are publishing Ness Owen’s first collection of poems, Mamiaith on 8th August.

The Title means Mother Tongue and the collection is partially bilingual, because when the manuscript arrived, and there were several poems about the Welsh language, my first question was, why aren’t these in Welsh?

Ness is of an age that she was not taught in Welsh in school but in English, so that Welsh was effectively taught as a foreign language. Although she is a native speaker, she is unconfident of the fine detail fo writing in Welsh. After some discussion we agreed that if she could find someone to help, at least some of the poems should be in both languages.

That help was supplied by Sian Northey in the main, but also Iona Evans.

Mamiaith
Pwy wnaeth ddwyn y geiriau
o geg fy mam a’u taflu yn
ôl ataf mewn darnau sy’n
disgyn i’w lle yn fy mhen ond
yn gwrthod disgyn ar bapur?
Fel perthynas annisgwyl, yn dal
ag ogla capal, yn twt-twtio yn
fy nghlust, ysgwyd ei phen
a thrio fy neud yn ddiarth i fy
eitifeddiaeth.
Wyrion y ‘Not’ pryd nawn ni
dorri’r cortyn? Sut nawn ni
ddweud ein stori yn yr iaith fain?
Yn baglu ac ymddiheuro
dan ni’n anadlu Mamiaith
yn barod am chwyldro
ond yn gwybod y bydd ein
hysgrifen yn ein bradychu.

 

Mamiaith
Stolen from my mother’s
mouth, thrown back to me
in pieces that fit so neatly
inside my head but will
not fall onto the page.
Like an uninvited relation
still smelling of chapel
she tuts in my ear, shakes
her head, tries to make
me a stranger to what’s
already mine.
Grandchildren of the Not
When will we break the chord?
How do we tell our story in
a thin language? Tongue-tied
excusing our way through
we breath in Mamiaith
waiting to be unearthed
always knowing our
pen will betray us.