Poetry Book Society review In Retail

An unexpected email today from the Poetry Book Society, sending me a PDF of the Summer bulletin, ‘with review of In Retail‘.

Really? I thought, we got a review?

It doesn’t say who wrote it, but thank you, whoever you are.

 Treading the line between wry absurdism and abject despair, In Retail is like reading anthropological field-notes from what should be an alien world but is, unfortunately, our own.

You can buy a copy on In Retail by Jeremy Dixon direct from our webshop, (post free in UK) or from your favourite independant bookshop.

Vindication review in The Lake

Brilliant review  of Vindication over on The Lake, from Hannah Stone:

Perhaps what resonates most from this collection is that whatever the subject matter, Wollstonecraft’s exhortation has been heeded throughout: ‘Women – endeavour to acquire/strength, both of mind and body,/ soft phrases, susceptibility/ of heart, delicacy of sentiment…’.

New review of Vindication on London Grip

Over on London Grip Carla Scarano has reviewed Vindication at length  https://londongrip.co.uk/2019/02/vindication/

a compelling collection… captivating prosody… sharp irony … fresh, thought-provoking… clear riveting lines…  The poems collected in the anthology form an absorbing analysis condensing some major issues in the vindication of women’s rights since Mary Wollstonecraft. They are a tribute commemorating women’s past sufferings and perseverance, and they point to present commitment to an ongoing fight.

In Retail customer feedback

The launch of Jeremy Dixon‘s poetry collection, In Retail seems to have met management guidelines for a successful promotion, we hope to bring you photos and video shortly, but as these were outsourced from Arachne’s web, to local operatives, I can’t tell you exactly when.

Don’t forget, for the whole of February you can get special offers on our other LGBT books when you buy In retail, check out the second page of our Special offers

In the meantime, we’ve been getting some feedback over on our shop page, with universal 5 star reviews. (Of course, these are all from people who pre-ordered, so we can assume they were quite keen in the first place) but you can now not only buy a copy from us direct, but leave your thoughts afterwards, like these lovely folk.

Jeremy’s poems are like stars in a bleak landscape, beautiful, funny and life affirming
Jane A. Verified buyer February 11, 2019

A warm, witty, and observant little collection. Well done, Jeremy !
Alan D. Verified buyer January 25, 2019

Arrived much quicker than I was expecting – and what a treat it was. Perfect purchase!
Rob W. Verified buyer January 23, 2019

Love it
Heather W. Verified buyer January 18, 2019

What a great little book, brilliantly observed with laugh out loud moments. Highly recommended
Celia D. Verified buyer January 16, 2019

I loved this book.  The poems give a humorous insight into the trials and tribulations of working in a retail shop. Love it!
Mrs C. Verified buyer December 23, 2018

By the way, there is ONE pre-order badge left. first to order gets it.

There’s lovely.

New review of Erratics over at The Lake

Cracking review by David Mark Williams of Cathy Bryant‘s Erratics  over on The Lake

Bryant is given to firing from the hip, the poems barely containing at times the incandescent exuberance of what she is driven to express.

and an interview on Wombwell Rainbow

You can buy a copy of Erratics here!

First review for In Retail

Review on London Grip ‘subversively humorous’

Thanks for understanding the design, Emma Lee!

You can preorder here, and get a free badge, we have a couple left.

The Amsterdam Launch of A Gift of Rivers

A couple of pictures from last week’s launch of A Gift of Rivers at Waterstones in Amsterdam.

Kate kept everyone engaged despite feeling a bit below par, and Tim says he sold lots of books (Kate noticed some people buying more than one copy, which is always nice.) Wish I could have been there!

There are a handful of copies left in store so anyone in Amsterdam who missed it Tim will be very pleased to sell you a copy.

Also available at all bookshops that stock poetry, and can be ordered by any that don’t, and of course direct from us.

There will be more readings soon, in the UK. watch this space!

In the meantime here’s the first review, from  London Grip

and the title poem

A GIFT OF RIVERS

Flying into Amsterdam
I see how a giant comb has pulled the hairs of the fields
into straight, wet lines, how the occasional hedge
runs on wiry feet away from the open,
how as the plane tilts
the edge of the water-land-water seems ghostly as the meniscus
an empty glass has left behind,
how the many transparent
voices of water thicken in canals
and the old windows in the city
are so like rolled water you wait for fish
to swim through their bubbles.

When I left the branches across our yard
were empty. Now small green fists
punch out space.

Thank you for your gift of rivers.

 

 

A new Review for Joy Howard’s Foraging from The Lake

A lovely review of Joy Howard‘s collection on The Lake poetry website from Jayne Marek

who says (amongst other things)

Foraging finds sustenance in the relics of our personal and collective histories, whether droll, sobering, or sad.  Howard’s confident insights show love and respect for “that same tide / which will come for all of us” (“Going Back”).

One of those reviews that reminds me all over again just why I published a book. (She even mentioned how much she likes the cover.)

cover design by Karen Keogh

Review of With Paper for Feet in Poetry Salzburg Review

We have a review of Jennifer A McGowan’s With Paper for Feet in Poetry Salzburg Review no 31 Autumn 2017 from Colin Pink.

And very appreciative it is too!

Here’s a taster

There’s a ribald, troubadour quality to McGowan’s poetry that reminded me strongly of the medieval French poet Francois Villon.

She retells traditional stories in a clear, conversational tone containing a generous dose of satire and wry humour. It’s a book that makes you smile.

Her clever, punchy, highly accessible writing has immediacy that I can imagine working very well as performance poetry.

 

The voices in McGowan’s verse are lively and compelling.

 

Anniversaries, war and diaries #Arachne5

As part of our Arachne 5th Anniversary celebrations, we’ve asked all of our authors to come up with a blog, that might have something to do with writing or anniversaries. Some of them responded! This one is from Jill Sharp whose poems we published in The Other Side of Sleep and Shortest Day, Longest Night.

August 17th 1944

‘There are moments when I would give anything just to get into a car and drive home, saying I was fed up with the whole show and they could look for someone else to fill my job. The making of plans is child’s play as compared with putting them into execution.’

 

It may be the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, but for me it’s been a summer of war, reading the edited WWII diaries of Alan Brooke. Brooke masterminded the very tricky retreat of the British Expeditionary Force to Dunkirk, and then oversaw Home Defence during 1940 when a Nazi invasion seemed imminent. For the last four and a half years of the war, he was at Churchill’s right hand day and (often) night, advising on military strategy as Chief of the Imperial General Staff.

The diary was written as a daily note to his wife back in Hampshire, about events at the decision-making hub in London, and became a safety-valve for a man experiencing almost unbearable stress and responsibility. Reading it, you’re closer to the uncertainty, fear and anxiety of the lived experience than any detached historical account can provide. It demonstrates the value of an immediate record, both as a historical source and also as an insight into the individual human psyche during momentous events.

I’ve been deeply impressed by Brooke – a man who managed to negotiate tricky human situations as well as military ones. It was a revelation to me how much skill was needed to steer Churchill and our American allies, let alone to devise overall military strategy.

Because the US had the greater number of allied forces in 1944, Brooke was passed over as Commander of Overlord in favour of Eisenhower. In his diary, he expresses deep frustration and concern at the American general’s often hesitant strategy, feeling the war in Europe could and should have been concluded that autumn, with a very different outcome for the political map of Europe.

March 5th 1945

‘Breakfast with Ike and another long talk with him. There is no doubt that he is a most attractive personality and, at the same time, a very, very limited brain from a strategic point of view… He only sees the worst side of Monty and cannot appreciate the better side… I see trouble ahead before too long.’

Brooke may have received all the official honours due to him, becoming Field Marshal Lord Alanbrooke. But this modest man, whose name, I feel, should stand as high as Nelson’s in our national consciousness, had to sell his beloved collection of bird books after the war, when his military pension was insufficient to support his family.

I’m grateful that Brooke finally agreed to make public what is a very private and personal document. So many similar texts are destroyed by their authors, out of consideration for their own reputations as well as others’. But what a unique form of writing a diary is, when it’s done with such non-self-regarding honesty.

Come to the 5th anniversary party!